Quadrennial Periodic Report
Irlanda 2020

Quadrennial Periodic Report - - 10/29/2020 - 22:06

General Information

Technical Information

Name of Party: 
Irlanda
Date of Ratification: 
2006
Officially Designated Point of Contact of the Convention: 
-
Describe the multi-stakeholder consultation process established for the preparation of this report, including consultations with relevant ministries, public institutions, local governments and civil society organizations.: 

The Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media has responsibility for developing and implementing culture and arts policy in Ireland. The Department works closely with its stakeholders on the development of policy and programmes, including the National Cultural Institutions and the Arts Council of Ireland, the Irish government agency with primary responsibility for the promotion and development of the arts in Ireland (http://www.artscouncil.ie).

The preparation of this report included consultation with the following stakeholders:

– Arts Council, the national agency for funding, developing and promoting the arts in Ireland;
- Culture Ireland, who work to promote Irish arts worldwide;
– Ireland's Creative Europe Desks – Culture & Media, who promote and support the EU Creative Europe programme at local, regional and national level;
– Creative Ireland, an Irish governmental culture-based initiative to mainstream creativity in the life of the nation.
-Culture Ireland, the Government entity charged with promoting Irish artists internationally.
--Department of Communications Climate Action and Environment
-Department of Foreign Affairs

All the stakeholders listed above were involved in the preparation of this report, which was coordinated by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sports and Media

Executive summary: 

The four goals of the UNESCO 2005 Convention are intrinsically reflected in cultural policy development in Ireland. In the past four years, the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media has published Culture 2025 – A National Cultural Policy Framework to 2025. This is the first such framework for culture in Ireland and sets out the key policies and programmes for the cultural and creative sector up to 2025. Under the Framework, the Government of Ireland has developed and is implementing an all of Government programme – Creative Ireland – tasked with making creativity part of the life of the nation and giving everyone the opportunity to access and experience culture and creativity.

At the same time, Global Ireland 2025 aims to double Ireland’s cultural footprint and double funding for the cultural and creative sector between 2018 and 2025. Under this all of Government programme, culture is recognized for its part in reaching out to Ireland’s diaspora and connecting with and forging deeper relations with other cultures. Cutural measures include the appointment of several high-profile ambassadors for culture and increased support for Irish cultural centres in a number of countries.

There have already been notable successes from the introduction of the aforementioned programmes, including the development of a Creative Youth Plan for children and young people as well as the development of Creative Communities plans for each local government authority area in Ireland, bringing opportunities for artists to work in diverse and often rural locations and simultaneously bringing diverse cultural experiences to new audiences. These policies and programmes support the growth of the cultural and creative sectors, emphasise the growing recognition of culture as a contributor to the sustainable development of Ireland’s regions and its role in fostering the creative potential of the child, as well as underpinning the development and mobility of artists and cultural operators. They are supported by an almost 15% increase in overall public finding for culture in the period 2016 to 2020.

2020 has been a year of disruption, however, due to the severe impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the cultural and creative sectors. While opportunities to perform live and travel have been severely curtailed, the sectors are using every opportunity to bring their art and talents to the public, primarily through online performance. Government and the various state agencies are working with the sector to support it through this time of crisis and help it to rebuild from the heavy toll of the pandemic.

Contact details of the stakeholders involved in the preparation of the quadrennial periodic report (QPR). Please also include the contact details of the civil society organizations (CSOs) if they have contributed to the QPR drafting, including through the CSO form.: 
Organization typeOrganizationEmailWebsite
Public Sector
Arts Council
andrew.mcsharry@artscouncil.ie
Public Sector
Creative Europe Desks Ireland
orla@creativeeuropeireland.eu
Public Sector
Creative Ireland
creativeireland@chg.gov.ie
Public Sector
Culture Ireland
info@cultureireland.gov.ie
Public Sector
Department of Communications Climate Action and Environment
customer.service@dccae.gov.ie
Public Sector
Department of Foreign Affairs
Public Sector
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
julie.flanagan@tscagsm.gov.ie

Goal 1 - Support Sustainable Systems of Governance for Culture

Cultural and Creative Sectors

A Ministry (or agency with ministerial status) is responsible for cultural and creative sectors: 
YES
Regional, provincial or local governments or administrations have decentralised responsibilities for policies and measures promoting the cultural and creative sectors:: 
YES
Regulatory frameworks and sector specific laws, policies and/or strategies supporting the cultural and creative industries have been revised or adopted during the last 4 years: 
YES
If YES, has at least one of them been designed through interministerial cooperation (involving different government departments responsible for policy areas, such as communication, education, ICT, trade, foreign affairs, labor, finance): 
YES
Specific education and training programmes in the arts and the cultural and creative sectors are established, including: 
Digital literacy programmes for creation and experimentation
Technical and vocational education and training programmes in
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Cultural management
Design
Digital cultural and creative sectors
Media arts
Music
Performing arts
Publishing
Visual arts
Tertiary and university education degrees in
Cinema/audiovisual arts
Cultural management
Design
Digital cultural and creative sectors
Media arts
Music
Performing arts
Publishing
Visual arts
Specific measures and programmes have been implemented over the last 4 years to: 
Support job creation in the cultural and creative sectors
Encourage the formalization and growth of micro/small and medium-sized cultural enterprises
Statistical offices or research bodies have produced data during the last 4 years: 
related to cultural and creative sectors
evaluating cultural policies
Share of cultural and creative sectors in Gross Domestic Product (GDP): 
2.80%
2018
Share of employment in the cultural and creative sectors: 
3.00%
2019
Please provide whenever possible disaggregated data by sector, age, sex and type of employment: 
Sub-Sector Employment ‘000s Printing and reproduction of recorded media: 7,400 Architectural services: 13,700 Publishing: 6,200 Motion picture, video and television programme production, sound recording and music publishing activities: 8,200 Programming and broadcasting activities: 5,200 Advertising and market research: 11,500 Creative, arts and entertainment activities: 12,000 Libraries, archives, museums and other cultural activities: 5,500 Total: 69,700
Total public budget for culture (in USD): 
366USD
2020
Please provide whenever possible the share allocated by cultural sectors/domains (in %): 
Based on EUR:USD Exchange rate 1:1.17 Culture: $226m Heritage: $72m Irish language, Gaeltacht, Islands: $68m
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Culture 2025 – A National Cultural Policy Framework to 2025

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
Arts Council
Heritage Council
Local Authorities
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Diseño
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Culture 2025 is Ireland’s first National Cultural Policy Framework that sets the direction for Government policy across the cultural sector, including the arts, the Irish language and the creative, heritage and audiovisual sectors. It details the Government’s aspirations for these areas and how these aspirations can be achieved. Central to Culture 2025 is the recognition of the value of culture and creativity to the individual and society, the need to support creative practice and cultural participation and a commitment to cherish Ireland’s cultural heritage. Key actions contained within Culture 2025 include: • Increasing access to and participation in the arts and boosting our creative industries; • Working collaboratively to enable the creative potential of every child and young person; • Investing in our Gaeltacht (designated Irish language speaking areas) and supporting the Irish language. • Supporting traditional culture and securing global recognition for unique Irish cultural traditions; and • Protecting and promoting Ireland’s natural habitats and biodiversity. Key values contained with Culture 2025 include: • The intrinsic value of culture; • The value of arts, culture and heritage to our lives and our communities; • The right of everyone to participate in the cultural and creative life of the nation; • The value of creativity to individual and collective wellbeing; • The value of cultural diversity, informed by the many traditions and social backgrounds that constitute contemporary Ireland; • The value of culture as a means of fostering a more sustainable future for Ireland, including through economic, environmental and social policy; and • The value of culture in presenting Ireland to the world. Culture 2025 is underpinned by a renewed Government commitment to double the amount of public funding for arts and culture from 2017 levels by 2025, from €288m ($336m) to €576m ($674m).
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
As a national cultural policy through to the year 2025, the expected results are wide-ranging and encompass the Government's entire broader cultural approach, affecting every aspect of Irish society and culture. The aims of Culture 2025 are being progressed through current Government initiatives including the Creative Ireland Programme, the 20-Year Strategy for the Irish Language, Global Ireland 2025, the National Biodiversity Action Plan and the Audiovisual Action Plan. It is also supported by the €1.2bn ($1.4bn) capital investment for culture, heritage and the Gaeltacht through Project Ireland 2040. Culture 2025 will ensure a unified approach to these cultural policies across Government and to planning and provision across the cultural sector.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

The policies and programmes under Culture 2025 are supported through cross-Departmental Government funding and are set out in more detail in individual measures below.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Department of Education
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Department of Children and Youth Affairs
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Arts Council
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Heritage Council
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Local Authorities
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Creative Ireland Programme

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Creative Ireland Office at the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
Government of Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Diseño
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Creative Ireland Programme is the Irish Government’s major five-year initiative, from 2017 to 2022, which places creativity at the centre of public policy. It is an all-of government initiative to mainstream creativity in the life of the people so that individually and collectively, in our personal lives and in our institutions, we can realise our full creative potential. It is the main implementation vehicle for the priorities identified in Culture 2025, which sees a vibrant cultural ecosystem as essential to society. The core proposition of this culture-based programme is that participation in cultural activity drives personal and collective creativity, with significant implications for individual and societal wellbeing and achievement. Its main feature is the collective mobilisation of Irish institutions and citizens to create an Irish cultural legacy. It brings an enhanced level of coordination, focus and leadership to existing policies and initiatives across national and local government, State agencies, the arts and culture sector, Gaeltacht and Irish language organisations, and provides linkages to the private business and NGO sectors. It also supports a representation of Ireland to the outside world that is well grounded, widely understood and meaningful. Creative Ireland coordinates and enables the construction of that representation, seeking coherence among all stakeholders and placing a clear focus on our rich cultural heritage and our creativity. Under the guiding principles of creativity, collaboration and transformation, the Programme strives to; • promote understanding and appreciation of the value of creativity in all its forms; • engage and influence decision-makers to embed creativity across public policy; and • support and enable participation in creative industries. The Creative Ireland programme consists of five pillars; 1. Enabling the Creative Potential of Every Child; 2. Enabling Creativity in Every Community; 3. Investing in our Creative and Cultural Infrastructure; 4. Ireland as a Centre of Excellence in Media Production; and 5. Unifying our Global Reputation
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Creative Ireland Programme works through various Government Departments and agencies to make significant progress in each of the five pillars listed above. Investments are focused on supporting direct engagement with creativity (e.g., on education, institutions, industry, etc.) as well as creativity as a way of engaging with broader societal issues (e.g. mental illness, social marginalisation, rural isolation, poverty, isolation of the aged, individuals with disabilities or special needs, migrant integration, intercultural dialogue, climate action, biodiversity loss, etc.). The following is a summary implementation update in respect of each of the pillars. 1. Enabling the Creative Potential of Every Child The national Creative Youth Plan was published in December 2017 with four key objectives: (i) supporting collaboration between formal and non-formal approaches to creativity in education; (ii) extending the range of creative activities for our young people; (iii) embedding the creative process by developing programmes that will enable teachers to help young people learn and apply creative skills and capacities; and (iv) continuing professional development for teachers working in Early Years, Primary and Post Primary Schools The Creative Youth Plan is led by a working group including the Creative Ireland Programme office in the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media, in partnership with the Department of Education and Skills, the Department of Children and Youth Affairs, and the Arts Council. The key results to date are: - Creating Positive Outcomes with Creative Schools: Through an annual grant and access to a Creative Associate (either a teacher with arts practice, or a creative or arts practitioner), schools are supported to develop and begin to implement their own Creative School plan. The long-term aim is to enable schools to fully embrace the arts and creativity, ensuring a positive experience and strong outcomes for children. Schools all around Ireland are now participating in this initiative, including primary, post-primary, Youthreach, Irish language, special schools and schools with DEIS (disadvantaged) status. - Fostering Co-Operation with Creative Clusters: Creative Clusters are groups of between two and five schools working together on a creative project. A facilitator provided by the Education Centre helps each cluster formulate their plan and a fund of €2,500 ($2925) is provided to each cluster. Projects include coding, drama, Green Forest and Wellbeing. - A Structured Approach to Creativity: Local Creative Youth Partnerships: These Partnerships provide a structure for the development and co-ordination of out-of-school creative activities for children and young people by bringing together a variety of actors in education, local government, community and arts sectors to establish and nurture new partnerships and networks. Partnerships also aim to enhance creative and cultural activities in disadvantaged areas. - Creative Ireland is also working with and providing support to Youth Theatre Ireland, Fighting Words creative writing skills initiative, Sing Ireland and Music Generation to enhance their offerings to children and young people. Cruinniú na nÓg, a national day of free creativity for children and young people was established in 2018 with 500 free events and activities organised. In 2019 this increased to over 780 free events/activities with an estimated 55,000 children participating. In 2020, Cruinniú moved online in response to the COVID-19 pandemic with over 500 events taking place mainly online and participation by almost 500,000 children and their families. 2. Enabling Creativity in Every Community Creative Communities engages local communities with creativity to support place-making, social cohesion (encompassing social inclusion), and the local creative economy. Through investment in the Local Authorities, initiatives were developed to enhance creativity in every community across Ireland. Each Local Authority published a Culture and Creativity Strategy 2018-2022 in consultation with their local communities. These are now being implemented through 1300+ projects a year. A cross-sectoral Culture and Creativity Team led by a local coordinator has been established in each Local Authority to lead this engagement of citizens with our heritage and culture. Projects have addressed people, place and identity, social, economic and environmental challenges and a clear picture has emerged of a common ambition and vision to work as pro-active catalysts, where creativity contributes to addressing the wider social challenges that constitute the context of and conditions for ‘wellbeing, social cohesion and economic success’ 3. Investing in our Creative and Cultural Infrastructure Investing in Our Culture, Language and Heritage 2018-2027 is a ten-year plan which sets out the commitment for capital investment in Ireland’s cultural, heritage and Irish language infrastructure. The development of this plan, facilitated by the Creative Ireland Programme vision, includes investment of €460 million ($538m) in Ireland’s national cultural institutions, ensuring that they continue to protect and present the national collections, as well as creating new spaces for creativity and engagement. A new capital grant scheme to renew and enhance existing arts and culture facilities throughout the country is also established. Notably, this new scheme, for which an initial funding envelope of almost €5 million ($5.85m) has been identified, includes environmental sustainability as a key criterion for investment in line with the Government’s new Climate Action Policy. 4. Ireland as a Centre of Excellence in Media Production A number of initiatives have been progressed under this pillar including; • A new €200 million ($234m) Audiovisual Action Plan to support the screen industries (feature film, TV drama, etc.) was published in June 2018, and it aims to position Ireland as a global hub for the production of film, TV drama and animation. There is more information on the Plan under Measure 6 of this Goal; • In response to the ambition of Future Jobs Ireland 2019 to identify opportunities in the wider creative industries sector, the Creative Ireland Programme is currently working to finalise a Roadmap for the Creative Industries, in consultation with the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation. The Roadmap is focused on the design-based, digital creative and content creation industries 5. Unifying our Global Reputation To realise the ambition for Ireland and Irish people to be recognised internationally as a cultural and creative nation, a number of key initiatives have been undertaken as follows: • Irish culture and creativity featured prominently in Global Ireland 2025, the most ambitious expansion of Ireland’s international presence ever undertaken. Many of its actions to bring Irish culture and heritage to the wider world have been delivered through the Department’s Culture Ireland programme including the hosting of a conference on how best we can promote our culture globally, capital support for the redevelopment of the Irish Arts Center New York and the London Irish Centre, and the appointment of five Cultural Ambassadors; • The Department’s Culture Ireland programme presented GB18, a special year-long programme designed to celebrate and renew the unique cultural relationship between Ireland and Great Britain. • Each year Culture Ireland support Ireland’s representation at the Venice Biennale, which offers a unique opportunity to showcase Irish talent to the world and enabled Irish architects to achieve international exposure with visitor numbers reaching over one quarter of a million; and • In 2019 a new partnership was created with the Fulbright Programme to enable three Irish post-graduate students opportunities to undertake short-term research at one of three world-class museums in the United States. In addition, some interesting innovations and partnerships emerged outside of the five pillars including; • the National Creativity Fund 2018/2019 was established to identify and support pilot projects that are genuinely innovative and significantly add value to the Creative Ireland Programme, and to help inform policy and/or cross-sectoral development in the area of culture, creativity and wellbeing; and • exploration in how the cultural and creative sectors can engage the public on the challenges and opportunities related to climate change and biodiversity loss in imaginative ways.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

Between 2017 and 2020, the Creative Youth and Creative Communities segments of the Creative Ireland Programmes were allocated over EU24m ($27.12m) in funding from the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media with additional funding from the Departments of Education and Children and Youth Affairs.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Creative Ireland has produced an annual report for each of the years 2017 and 2018 and a progress report for 2019 and up to April 2020. The reports set out the projects funded, the achievements of the programme to date and the full breakdown of expenditure each year. In this regard, the reports demonstrate that the programme is meeting the annual objectives set.

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Government Departments
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Local Authorities
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
National Cultural Institutions
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Heritage Council of Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Third Level Education Sector
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Arts Council of Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Global Ireland- Ireland’s Global Footprint to 2025

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Government of Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Global Ireland 2025 is the Government’s strategy for doubling the scope and impact of Ireland’s global footprint in the period 2018 to 2025. It represents the most ambitious renewal and expansion of Ireland’s international presence ever undertaken. It enables Ireland to be more ambitious in advancing our strategic international objectives, promoting our values and exerting our influence, both within and beyond the European Union. It accelerates progress on diversifying and growing Ireland’s exports, inward investment and tourism, particularly in response to the challenges posed by the UK’s departure from the EU. It strengthens Ireland’s engagement with our 70 million-strong diaspora, and bolsters our efforts to bring our culture and heritage to the wider world. It also supports Ireland’s foreign policy objectives including international development, peace, disarmament and security. Global Ireland 2025 commits to a number of measures which will positively impact the creative and cultural sectors, these include; • Promotion of Irish arts, heritage and culture to new generations and new audiences across the world. • Enable Culture Ireland to implement a seven-year programme of international promotion of Irish arts and culture, • Appoint high-profile actors and artists as Cultural Ambassadors for Ireland. • Convene a conference of cultural stakeholders to discuss how best to establish curated and strategic cultural programmes that advance our global visibility and strengthen our global relationships. • Establish a network between Irish cultural centres across Europe and North America • Expand Ireland’s network of international film co-production treaties, including with China, and increase opportunities for Irish producers to co-produce more effectively with international producers, media organisations and major studios. • Double the size of Ireland’s film production sector through Screen Ireland, which has been allocated €200 ($234m) million for a 10- year capital investment programme under the National Development Plan • Launch a MOOC (an online course aiming for unlimited participation) with an accredited qualification in the Irish Language and Irish Traditional Culture • Implement an annual programme of region-specific international campaigns promoting Ireland’s culture and media to both new and growth markets and audiences over the period 2018-2025. • Promoting Ireland’s values of peace, humanitarianism, equality and justice, including through Ireland’s successful campaign for election to the UN Security Council.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Successful implementation of Global Ireland 2025 requires multi-annual cross government coordination involving all relevant Departments and agencies. The results in the culture segment to date include; • Five high‐profile Cultural Ambassadors appointed for a period of three years. • A Global Ireland conference of cultural stakeholders took place in order to identify how best to improve Ireland’s global visibility and strengthen our global relationships. • Culture Ireland continues to support Irish artists performing internationally. • Continued strategic partnerships with a number of cultural centres, including the Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris and the New York Irish Arts Center. • Government commitment of £1m towards the redevelopment of the London Irish Centre. It will be a flagship Irish cultural centre, alongside the Irish Arts Center, New York and Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris which present a year‐ round programme of Irish artists in these key cultural cities. • In 2018, supported by significant investment from the Irish Government, the Irish Arts Centre in New York broke ground on its new upgraded facility. The project is due for completion in 2020. • Recruitment has begun to appoint a number of Cultural Officers in international locations, who will be tasked with promoting Irish culture, creating new opportunities for Irish artists in key locations and maximizing the impact internationally of Government support for Irish artists. • A number of cross‐ sectoral regional strategies have been published, helping to intensify Ireland’s relations with specific regions, increasing trade and investment, improving political relationships, promoting Irish culture, and increasing people‐to‐people exchanges. • Ireland is also increasingly a centre of excellence for film, animation and TV production, opening windows into Ireland for new audiences and future visitors, and creating job opportunities for Irish artists and technicians. • Current funding of over €1m per annum is provided for teaching Irish in over forty universities worldwide. • In 2020 Ireland successfully secured a seat on the UN Security Council for the period 2021 -2022, which will place Ireland at the heart of UN decision-making on matters of vital importance, including international peace, security and development. • Ireland is highly regarded for its role in championing the universality and indivisibility of human rights and the protection of those who advocate and defend these rights. Ireland is actively pursuing initiatives it pioneered during its term on the UN Human Rights Council (2013-15), notably the protection and promotion of the role of civil society. • Ireland’s strong record at the United Nations of promoting the rights of women and girls is currently being carried forward through recent chairing of the Commission on the Status of Women (2018 & 2019), the principal global intergovernmental body exclusively dedicated to the promotion of gender equality.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

Full cost of Global Ireland by 2025 is costed at EU300 million ($338m).

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

A one-year progress report was published in July 2019 measuring progress to date against objectives. The report noted that while the focus at this early stage of the strategy has been on laying the foundation stones for future success, implementation is well on track. As data becomes available, future progress reports will quantify the impact of Global Ireland on key performance metrics.

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Government Departments
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

‘Investing in our Culture, Language & Heritage 2018-2027’ under Project Ireland 2040

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Government of Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Diseño
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Project Ireland 2040 is the Government of Ireland’s long-term overarching strategy to make Ireland a better country for all of its people. The objective is to provide better social, economic and cultural infrastructure so that every individual and every part of the country can reach its potential. As part of this strategy, the Government of Ireland published their ten year plan ‘Investing in our Culture, Language & Heritage 2018-2027’ which sets out the commitment to a €1.2 billion ($1.4bn) capital investment programme which aims to underpin the aspirations for our culture and creativity with solid infrastructural foundations. The Plan will help to promote Ireland and celebrate it as a centre of cultural excellence, a source of rich natural and built heritage and the home of one of Europe’s oldest and richest languages. The Plan includes the following priorities; • Strengthen Ireland’s reputation as a leader in the cultural arena through the development of a world class network of cultural and heritage infrastructure; • Allow greater cultural participation by citizens all across Ireland through increasing the capacity of the entire cultural sector; • Address longstanding infrastructural issues in our National Cultural Institutions; • Enhance arts and culture centres throughout the country; • Secure our national literary and archaeological collections through the provision of storage facilities of an international standard; • Develop a vibrant Media Production and Audio Visual sector, bringing new economic opportunities across Ireland, through increased Government support; and • Develop the sustainable tourism potential of our culture and heritage infrastructure through ongoing partnership with Fáilte Ireland.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media undertook €35.04m ($40.1m) in capital expenditure relating to Culture in 2019, the second year of Investing in our Culture, Language and Heritage. Since the launch of the plan ‘Investing in our Culture, Language and Heritage, 2018- 2027’, work has progressed on a broad range of capital works including redevelopments at a number of our National Cultural Institutions; As part of the Plan, in 2019 the Government announced the €4.7m ($5.5m) capital investment scheme for arts and culture centres across the country. Applications were invited for the Cultural Capital Scheme which will run from 2019-2022. The Scheme will focus on enhancing the existing stock of arts and culture centres that operate as not-for-profit organisations throughout the country and that have a clearly defined arts and culture focus.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

EU1.2bn ($1,36bn) in capital funding for culture, heritage and our language over a ten year period.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Government of Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
National Cultural Institutions
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Local Authorities
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Making Great Art Work - Leading the Development of the Arts in Ireland Arts Council Strategy (2016–2025)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Arts Council
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Diseño
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Making Great Art Work (MGAW) is the Arts Council’s strategy for the arts in Ireland from 2016-2025. The aim is that over the decade 2016–2025, the centrality of the arts to Irish life will have been strengthened by the Arts Council’s advocacy, support of artists throughout their careers, by the involvement of many agencies in cultural provision, by the impact of the arts on the creative economy, and by the depth and breadth of people’s engagement with the arts as a valued feature of their lives. Within the strategy there are twenty-one objectives - with a focus on partnerships; social inclusion; diverse communities and contexts; and arts provision for children and young people. It sets out five priority areas, each with a distinct goal. There are two policy areas that are identified as priorities: • ‘The Artist’ – Goal: Artists are supported to make excellent work which is enjoyed and valued; and • ‘Public Engagement’ – Goal: More people will enjoy high-quality arts experiences. In addition it designates three areas of planning and decision-making as priorities, as follows; • ‘Investment Strategy’ – Goal: Public monies are invested effectively to realise our priorities; • ‘Spatial and Demographic Planning’ – Goal: Well-planned arts provision benefits people across Ireland; and • ‘Developing Capacity’ – Goal: The Arts Council and the arts sector have the knowledge, skills and inventiveness to realise this strategy. The Arts Council upholds the rights of children and young people to enjoy their full cultural entitlements and accordingly a core objective of this strategy is ‘planning and providing for young people’, which states; • advocate for the centrality of the arts in formal education at all levels and for the provision of quality vocational training in the arts; • work with the Departments of Arts and of Education to achieve full implementation of the Arts in Education Charter; • invest in artists, arts organisations and key programmes dedicated to developing high quality work in arts-in-education and youth arts, and support the provision of excellent arts experiences for young people in the public domain; • make provision for children and young people a key focus of the Arts Council’s relationship with local government; • incorporate the Arts Council’s commitment to young people into the mainstream of decision-making and, where appropriate, into funding agreements with arts organisations. In their Three Year Plan- 2020-2022 the Arts Council reiterates its continued work to keep the arts at the centre of all national policy making and will continue much of the work started over the last three years: refining it, improving it and further developing it. The Plan is more externally focused, engaging more with diverse communities across Ireland, placing equality and human rights at the centre of all their activities and providing opportunities for artists and arts organisations to develop their skills and capacities in innovative and new ways across the digital realm and in cross-disciplinary practice.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Three-year planning cycles within the decade long strategic framework enables the achievement of medium-term objectives and long-term goals. During the Three-Year Plan 2017–2019 the following results were achieved; • Introduction of a new funding framework, which the Arts Council will continue to improve and streamline over the next three years; • New systems developed to better capture and use data and evidence to support decision-making and advocacy work; • New programmes and policies developed in the areas of diversity, equality and human rights, targeting support to particular communities. • Renewal and development of relationships with local authorities; • Review of how arts centres across the country were supported; • Commencement of the important work of addressing artists’ pay and conditions. Achievements to date include; • The Arts Council commissioned a study, carried out by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), which looked at arts and cultural participation among children and young people http://www.artscouncil.ie/uploadedFiles/Arts-and-cultural-particiption-GUI.pdf). • The Arts in Education Portal (http://www.artsineducation.ie) is a key national digital resource for arts and education practice in Ireland. • Creative Schools is a flagship initiative of the Creative Ireland Programme and is led by the Arts Council. The long term aim is for every school to be supported to fully embrace the arts and creativity, ensuring a positive experience and strong outcomes for children and young people. • The Arts Council oversees three distinct programmes of activity in the area of international arts: the Creative Europe Desk Ireland – Culture Office; the Venice Biennale; Mobility of Artists and the provision of awards to support international collaboration. • Arts participation is a core value for the Arts Council in its commitment to increasing public access, participation and engagement in the arts. It is broken down into five different strands, each with its own set of knowledge, expertise and cross-sector partnerships. These include: Arts and Health; Arts and Disability; Cultural Diversity and the Arts; Arts and Communities; and Arts and Older People. The Arts Council funds a number of key organisations and agencies that have a central role in supporting these strands of work. • In 2019 the Arts Council launched their Equality, Human Rights and Diversity Policy and Strategy which builds on their work areas in Arts and Disability, Cultural Diversity and Arts Policy and Dignity at Work. • The Arts Council offers a wide range of financial supports across artforms and arts practices, including those that actively promote cultural diversity and the arts. • Arts and Disability Connect (ADC) is a new scheme open to artists with disabilities working in any art form. • Arts and health embraces a range of arts practices occurring primarily in healthcare settings, which bring together the skills and priorities of both arts and health professionals. • There are a number of agencies funded by the Arts Council which have a central role in supporting and encouraging older people to get involved in the arts. • The Arts Council offers a wide range of financial supports across artforms and arts practices, including arts and communities. • The Arts Council launched the Paying the Artist Policy in 2020 in line with their commitment to improving the living and working conditions of the artist. • A negotiation is underway with key national stakeholders to progress with investment agreements between the Strategic Banking Cooperation of Ireland and the arts sector to provide a specific Loan Guarantee for the arts sector to avail of.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

Funding for the Arts Council in 2020 totals EU105m ($123m). This will increase to EU130m ($152m) in 2021. The significant year on year increase in funding reflects, in part, the key role that the Arts Council plays in supporting artists both during and in the eventual aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic environment.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Government Departments
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Arts Council
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Audiovisual Action Plan

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment
Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation
Broadcasting Authority of Ireland
Screen Ireland
Department of Finance
Department of Education and Skills
Revenue Commissioners
Enterprise Ireland
IDA Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
This is an industry-wide, long-term plan, under the Creative Ireland Programme, developed to support the Government’s ambition to enable Ireland to become a global hub for the production of film, TV drama and animation. As referenced above, the Creative Ireland Programme is a five-year initiative, from 2017 to 2022, which places creativity at the centre of public policy. The Audiovisual Action Plan is designed to deliver on the commitment in Pillar 4 to create an industry-wide plan to make Ireland a leader in the audiovisual sector and is intended to drive both increased investment and production across the sector. The Audiovisual Action Plan sets out the Government's high-level, strategic priorities over the next ten years to develop a vibrant media production and audiovisual sector bringing new economic opportunities across Ireland, through increased Government support. The Audiovisual Action Plan seeks to implement policy recommendations in 8 key areas: (1) Oversight of Industry by Steering Group (2) Section 481 Film Tax Credit (3) Strategic Review of Feature Film Funding (4) Funding (5) Skills Development (6) Regulatory Reform (7) Marketing (8) Other Supports and Reform To date, investment under the Plan has played an important role in supporting and stimulating local economies. The European Commission gave approval to the extension of the film tax credit, section 481 until 2024. In addition, the Regional Film Development Uplift credit was introduced which provides an additional tax credit over the four years from 2019 to 2022 to incentivise film production in areas outside of traditional production hubs. 2019 also saw additional funding for Screen Ireland to support increased investment in feature films and TV drama and in 2019 Screen Ireland opened the TV Drama Production funding scheme. Training and skills development have been a key focus under the AV plan. Screen Skills Ireland introduced new certified programmes including ‘Creative Leadership’ and ‘Advanced Producers’ (both in partnership with Technological University (TU) Dublin). Screen Skills Ireland now also play a key role in developing skills development plans in conjunction with producer companies as part of applications for section 481 film tax credit. In 2019, Ireland signed the revised Council of Europe Convention on Cinematographic Co-production which will facilitate partnerships on co-productions with other European countries. Other key achievements under the plan include the workshops on commercialisation of animation intellectual property and improved marketing of Ireland’s audiovisual sector.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The plan was launched in June 2018 and a First Progress Report on implementation of the Plan was published in 2019. It was found that under the eight policy areas, key achievements in the first year of implementation included: • Clear ownership of the Implementation Plan with cross-departmental and agency engagement; • Extension of the Section 481 tax credit to 2024; • Revision of Section 481 Regulations; • Increase in funding to Screen Ireland which has led to increased investment in TV drama, skills development, support to visit markets and establishing ways to provide a stronger presence in key markets such as Los Angeles; • Signing of the revised Council of Europe Convention on Cinematographic Co-production; • Developments relating to reform of the TV Licence fee model; • Introduction of the Regional Film Development Uplift; • Development of new skills development courses and enhanced training and skills development opportunities as part of Section 481 revisions.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

This includes funding to Screen Ireland which is the development agency for the Irish film, television and animation industry; funding to the BAI (Broadcasting Authority of Ireland), the section 481 tax credit. The initiative Investing in our Culture, Language and Heritage 2018 - 2027 incorporates an amount of EU200m ($234m) for investment in Media Production and the Audiovisual Industry through Screen Ireland over the period of that initiative.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Government Departments
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Broadcasting Authority of Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Screen Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Revenue Commissioners
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Enterprise Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
IDA Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Media Diversity

Public service media has a legal or statutory remit to promote a diversity of cultural expressions: 
YES
Policies and measures promote content diversity in programming by supporting: 
Regional and/or local broadcasters
Linguistic diversity in media programming
Community programming for marginalised groups (e.g. indigenous peoples, migrants and refugees, etc.)
Socio-cultural programming (e.g. children, youth, people with disabilities, etc.)
Domestic content regulations for audio-visual media exist (e.g. quotas for production or distribution requirements for national films, TV series or music on radio): 
NO
Regulatory authority(ies) monitoring media exist: 
YES
If YES, please provide the name and year of establishment of the regulatory authority(ies): 
The Broadcasting Authority of Ireland (BAI) was established by the Broadcasting Act 2009.
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) monitor: 
Public media
Community media
Private sector media
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) are responsible for: 
Issuing licenses to broadcasters, content providers, platforms
Receiving and addressing public complaints such as online harassment, fake news, hate speech, etc.
Monitoring cultural (including linguistic) obligations
Monitoring gender equality in the media
Monitoring editorial independence of the media
Monitoring diversity in media ownership (diversity of ownership structures, transparency of ownership rules, limits on ownership concentration, etc.)
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Media Merger regime

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Communications, Climate Action & Environment
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The media mergers regime exists to consider the effect of a proposed media merger on plurality of media in the State. Following clearance from the Competition and Consumer Protection Commission of the European Commission, the parties to a proposed media merger must notify the Minister for Communications, Climate Action & Environment. Upon receipt of the notification the Department conduct a phase 1 assessment of the media merger. The Minister may make one of three determinations, that a media merger may proceed, that a media merger may proceed subject to conditions posed by the parties to the merger, or that a phase 2 assessment of the media merger is required. If a phase 2 assessment is required, the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland will conduct the phase 2 assessment and provide a report for the Minister. Following a phase 2 the Minister may make one of three determinations, that a media merger may proceed, a media merger may proceed subject to conditions or a media merger may not proceed.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
To date 28 media mergers have been assessed on plurality grounds.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Broadcasting Authority of Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Entorno digital

Policies, measures or mechanisms are in place to support the digital transformation of cultural and creative industries and institutions (e.g. funding for digitization of analogue industries): 
YES
Policies or measures have been introduced to ensure vibrant domestic digital cultural and creative industries markets with a diversity of e-players of all sizes (e.g. fair remuneration rules; control market concentration; prevention of monopolies of digital content providers/distributors or their algorithms that potentially restrict the diversity of cultural expressions, etc.):: 
NO
Policies and measures have been implemented to enhance access to and discoverability of domestically produced cultural content in the digital environment (e.g. action plans or policies for digital content pluralism, public support to cultural or artistic portals in specific languages, national or regional online distribution platforms for domestic content, etc.): 
YES
Measures and initiatives have been implemented to promote digital creativity and competencies of artists and other cultural professionals working with new technologies (e.g. spaces for experimentation, incubators, etc.): 
YES
Statistics or studies with recent data on access to digital media, including on the type of cultural content available through digital media, are available: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Europeana

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Europeana Foundation
Europeana Network Association
Aggregators Forum
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Medios de comunicación
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Europeana is an initiative endorsed by the European Commission. It is an internet platform that acts as a single access point to millions of books, paintings, films, museum objects and archival records that have been digitised throughout Europe. It provides the opportunity to share our cultural heritage with a wider audience and assists in building new partnerships and encourages the exchange of knowledge between interested parties. They develop expertise, tools and policies to embrace digital change and encourage partnerships that foster innovation. It provides opportunities for people to use cultural heritage for education, research, creation and recreation. The work of Europeana contributes to an open, knowledgeable and creative society.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Ireland is fully supportive of the work of Europeana and continues to be an active member through representation by our cultural organisations in the Europeana Network and also through their participation in a variety of Europeana's projects. Ongoing engagement of our national cultural institutions with this project is strongly encouraged. Irish cultural highlights in Europeana include the 1901/1911 Census, the Treaty documents, audio records of “Nocturnes” by John Field, a picture of the painting “The Wounded Poacher” by Henry Jones Thaddeus, picture of the sculpture called “High Cross of Muiredach”, and many more. • The following Irish institutions have provided content for Europeana to date: o National Library of Ireland o National Archives of Ireland o National Museum of Ireland o National Gallery of Ireland o The Chester Beatty Library o The Crawford Art Gallery o Irish Traditional Music Archive o The Royal Irish Academy o Trinity College Dublin o University College Dublin o Comhaltas Ceoltorí Éireann o James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway o Irish Manuscripts Commission
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES

Measures implemented to enhance access to the Irish Language in the digital environment

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sports and Media
State Agencies
Various Stakeholders
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Implementation of a Digital Plan for the Irish Language allows for greater access to digital resources developed for the benefit of speakers and learners of the Irish language. The provision of a digital Irish language infrastructure enhances learning, provides information and supports the cultural services.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
A Digital Strategy for the Irish Language is due to be launched later in 2020. The Irish language enjoys great prominence in the cultural sector. For example, as part of the Seachtain na Gaeilge (Week of Irish) celebration, Irish versions of popular Irish musicians’ hit records have been published and this has been a great success since 2005. Link to the 2018 collection of songs https://cnag.ie/en/schools/school-resources/ceol.html Creative Ireland supported the establishment in October 2019 of Fighting Words Connemara, based at Ionad Cultúrtha an Phiarsaigh (Pearse Cultural Centre) in Ros Muc, where the workshops take place through the Irish language . Fighting Words aims to help children and young people to discover and harness the power of their own imaginations and creative writing skills subsequently strengthening their resilience, creativity and successful shapers of their own lives. Classes take place in Ionad Cultúrtha an Phiarsaigh three days a week. The National Folklore Collection UCD was placed on the UNESCO Memory of the World Register as it has a large archive of oral tradition and cultural history and much of the material has been digitised and is freely available at www.duchas.ie. The Clár TechSpace project is a national project that aims to impact the lives of young people by becoming Ireland’s leading creative technology network for outcome focused youth development through the medium of Irish. TechSpace is a national network of digital media spaces in youth centres and schools. The network helps young people to create digital and technological material as they engage in activities such as digital film, web design, mobile app development and robotics, among others. Under the direction of trained instructors and mentors, young people can enhance their computer competency, while improving their self-confidence and social skills, all through the medium of Irish. Funding of €413,317 was provided in 2019 to expand the programme nationwide and also to hold a Tech Féile (Tech Celebration). Funding of €495,950 is approved for this year (2020) for the continuation and expansion of the Programme. The comprehensive TechSpace curriculum has now been translated into Irish and published in the first ever Irish language diary for teachers – we anticipate a great demand for the diaries within the TechSpace Network of educators. An Taibhdhearc is the Irish Language National Theatre and is based in Galway. Its website has an extensive archive of photographs and material pertaining to the theatre since its inception. http://antaibhdhearc.com/stair/cartlann/ A variety of schemes to support Irish language technology initiatives are being progressed and developed, including the development of machine translation systems by Dublin City University (DCU) and Trinity College Dublin, the text to speech synthesis project Abair.ie, digitisation projects in DCU and the Royal Irish Academy, LEX programme for the provision of terminology for EU institutions. These projects include Logainm.ie, Ainm.ie, Dúchas.ie LEX/IATE, the Rules of the Superior Courts and the Gaeltech projects in addition to the text to speech synthesiser project, www.Abair.ie, based in Trinity College, Dublin. Fáilte ar Líne (Welcome online) is an Irish language and culture online learning initiative developed by DCU, co-funded by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the 20 Year Strategy for the Irish Language 2010-2030. Fáilte ar Líne is accessible to everyone, anywhere in the world. Participants are able to progress from beginner to advanced courses and can complete a full degree in Irish language and culture entirely online. Launched in 2018, over 80,000 people have participated in the online courses thus far from 136 countries. The course from Dublin City University & FutureLearn is available at www.failteonline.ie ‘Foclóir Stairiúil na Gaeilge’ (historical dictionary of Irish) – an initiative of the Royal Irish Academy – is funded by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media and is one of the most ambitious linguistic research projects to be ever undertaken in Europe with over 70 million words already compiled and digitised, and freely accessible. Its primary objective is to establish an historical dictionary of Modern Irish (1600-2000) which will show the evolution of the language in the given period. It will be based on digitised corpora to include printed texts, texts from manuscripts and material from other sources. Grant funding of €920,183 was approved in 2019 for this project for the duration 2019-2024.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

EU1.8m ($2.1m)

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Conradh na Gaeilge
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Creative Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
The National Folklore Collection, University College Dublin (UCD)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Dublin City University (DCU)
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Trinity College Dublin
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Royal Irish Academy
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Irish Film Board (Screen Ireland) Strategic Plan 2016—2020

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Screen Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Irish Film Board (Screen Ireland) Strategic Plan 2016-2020 sets out their mission statement and vision, as well as emphasising their core values. It identifies the core strategic objectives which, when taken as a whole, aim to strengthen the agency and build on successes to date. Objectives include: - Building Audiences - Development and Support of Creative Screen Content Production - Development of Talent and Skills - Inward Production and Investment - Partnerships for Screen Production An implementation plan was established to execute the various actions developed in this strategy.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Screen Ireland supports various initiatives and partnerships aimed at developing and investing in Irish creative talent as well as supporting emerging and established voices. In response to Screen Ireland’s commitment to empowering and supporting female creative talent, the POV Low Budget Training & Production Scheme is a filmmaking initiative aimed at female writers and directors. The aim of this training scheme is to support the development and production of low budget feature films, and to enable distinct Irish female voices with a passion to tell stories on the big screen. In addition to supporting female filmmaking talent, the POV scheme is about creating opportunities for cast and crew. Cine4 is a funding initiative, supported by TG4 (the Irish language channel), Screen Ireland and Broadcasting Authority of Ireland partnership, to develop original feature films in the Irish language. It encourages strong storytelling, visual flair and high production values appropriate for the big screen. Spotlight is a funding initiative aimed at discovering and developing fresh and exciting screenwriting talent in Ireland. The scheme is intended as an opportunity for new writers to develop a feature film screenplay, with guidance and mentorship from leading industry figures at the very beginning of their careers. RTÉ (the national broadcaster) in association with Screen Ireland support two initiatives to develop new drama and comedy series for younger audiences, which are designed to develop emerging creative Irish talent and have the potential to showcase Irish talent on the global stage. The international co-production development fund is a funding partnership between Creative BC and Screen Ireland, which provides support to five motion picture projects, each with Canadian and Irish producers. Screen Ireland supports the annual Ireland Week in Los Angeles, as the international spotlight is firmly placed on Irish culture at the week-long event.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

Screen Ireland funding in 2020 is EU21m ($24.5m)

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Screen Ireland
Name of partner: 
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
RTÉ
Name of partner: 
TG4
Name of partner: 
Broadcasting Authority of Ireland
Name of partner: 
Ireland Week LA

Extension of the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland’s Archiving Scheme

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Broadcasting Authority of Ireland
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sports and Media
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The BAI archiving funding scheme was instigated to address the absence of a national audio visual archiving policy. The Scheme seeks to contribute to the preservation of lreland's broadcasting heritage and a record of lrish culture, heritage and experience by supporting the development of an archiving culture in the lrish broadcasting sector. The Scheme concerns programme material and advertisements broadcast in whole or in part, or recorded for broadcast, on radio and/or television. The BAI administered three funding rounds under the first Archiving Scheme, which expired in April 2016. Following a review process, a second Archiving Scheme was launched in June 2018 and will run until 2022.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Work completed in 2016 included a project undertaken by TG4 to digitise, catalogue and make accessible approximately 1,400 hours of music and documentary programming, and The Radharc Trust’s project to preserve production material, documentation and photographs generated by the Radharc productions from 1964–1997. Projects funded with the support of the Scheme in 2017 included the Irish Film Archive’s Adverts Project, which saw the conservation and digitisation of a selection of television advertisements from the 1960s to the 1980s. This project has been made available on the Irish Film Institute’s Player and provides a fascinating look at Irish consumer society and culture over three decades. Separately, the RTÉ News Collection Archive from Ireland’s national broadcaster was launched in October 2017. With funding support from the Archiving Scheme, this project digitised a selection of videotape recordings of RTÉ News from 1985-1999. Accessible online via RTÉ Archives, the selection captures a range of footage, from historic news stories to those more light-hearted in nature. In 2018 the funding round focused on the safeguarding of programme material threatened by fragile physical condition or soon-to-be obsolete formats. In December 2018 six projects were awarded funding under the Archiving Scheme. Applications were structured on strategic approaches to the safeguarding of valuable cultural content and, in particular, to developing and adhering to internationally accepted archiving standards, building capacity and knowledge and providing ease of access for the public to collections. A partnership approach was also evident across a number of the applications, which is encouraged by the Scheme and met with one of the main objectives, that of developing an integrated approach to archiving. In 2019, the scheme focused on the archiving of programme material with the specific objective of the preservation of a historic record of Irish culture, heritage and experience and, in particular, that which safeguards historic material that is threatened by fragile physical condition or soon to be obsolete formats. Thirteen applications were received in total, from which six projects were awarded €1.89 million. In 2020, common with the previous rounds under the Scheme, the latest round focused on the safeguarding of programme material threatened by fragile physical condition or soon to be obsolete formats. Eleven applications were received in total, from which five projects were awarded funding of €1.34 million.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

2019-2020 funding EU3.2m ($3.74m)

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

ln the last quarter of 2016, the BAI undertook a review of the Scheme, which encompassed the following:

I. Examination of the operation, effectiveness and impact of the Scheme in the context of its objectives, both internally and externally;
The findings show that the impact of the Scheme has been positive and in particular, the cultural benefit is noteworthy in that the Scheme has facilitated the safeguarding of material of historical and cultural value that would otherwise have been lost

II. Identification of recommendations for revisions to the Scheme;
The findings also show that the Scheme has been effective in achieving its objectives. This includes safeguarding broadcast material of heritage value and also, importantly, encouraging and promoting archiving activities within the wider broadcasting sector including amongst the independent community and commercial broadcasters and the independent production sector. The access to the archived broadcast material was viewed as critical and a positive aspect of the Scheme.

III. Identification of proposed operational improvements in the context of the current Scheme
The overall findings reveal that stakeholders who engaged with the Scheme had a positive experience. However, there were four common opinions across the feedback for actions that could improve the operation of the Scheme:
a) More supporting information about the Scheme should be provided;
b) The application process should be streamlined;
c) More detailed feedback should be provided in the BAI's assessment reports of applications; and
d) The grant agreement process should be streamlined.

Partnering with Civil Society

Professional organizations and/or trade unions representing artists and/or cultural professionals in the following sectors exist in your country (i.e. federation of musicians, publishers unions, etc.): 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Publishing
Visual Arts
Performing Arts
Public funding schemes supporting CSOs involvement in promoting the diversity of cultural expressions exist: 
YES
Training and mentoring opportunities were organized or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years to build skills on communication, advocacy and/or fundraising of civil society organizations involved in the promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions: 
YES
Dialogue mechanisms between public authorities and CSOs for cultural policy making and/or monitoring have been implemented during the last 4 years (meetings, working groups, etc.): 
YES
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
As part of the development of Culture 2025 – Ireland’s National Framework for Cultural Policy – significant public and sectoral consultation was undertaken to inform the development of the Framework.
The Department has set up an Arts and Culture Recovery Taskforce to examine and provide recommendations to the Minister on supporting the sector in its response to and recovery from the impact of COVID-19. The Taskforce is comprised of Government Departments, the Arts Council, CSO representative organisations and individual artists.
Policies and measures promoting the diversity of cultural expressions have been elaborated in consultation with CSOs during the last 4 years: 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Professional Organisations and or trade unions representing artists/audiovisual/cultural professionals

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Screen Directors Guild
Writers Guild of Ireland
Screen Producers Ireland
National Campaign for the Arts
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Screen Directors Guild of Ireland (SDGI) Established in 2000, the Screen Directors Guild of Ireland (SDGI) is the representative body for directors involved in the Irish and international audiovisual industry. These include directors of feature films, fiction, animation documentary, television drama, short films, video art and commercials. The guild has a number of core objectives designed to support Irish screen directors and promote Irish directors on a national and international scale. These can be described as follows: • To promote the economic and creative rights of screen directors and awareness of their role and status as artists. • To represent the screen directors of Ireland nationally and internationally, promote awareness of their work and create a comprehensive resource, information and contact infrastructure. • To encourage dialogue in the spirit of fairness, co-operation and clarity between film and arts organisations to encourage creative quality and diversity within audio-visual culture. On behalf of its members, SDGI seeks to improve the working environment for directors which boosts productivity in the industry. SDGI represents the views of its members to relevant bodies in the audiovisual industry on a number of issues affecting directors and the independent film, television and animation sector. The Screen Directors Guild of Ireland is a member of the European Federation of Directors Organisations (FERA), The International Federation of Directors Organisations (IFDO) and is affiliated to the International Affiliation of English Speaking Directors Organisations (IAESDO). SDGI receive funding from the Irish Film Board and the Arts Council. The Writers Guild of Ireland (WGI) The Writers Guild of Ireland (WGI) is the representative body in Ireland for writers for the stage, screen, radio and digital media. The Guild is an organisation run by writers for writers. Members are kept informed of news about the industry through their blog and fortnightly electronic newsletter, offer advice on contracts, organise talks and meetings, set up information sessions about issues of concern and lobby government agencies on matters pertaining to playwrights and screenwriters. WGI also liaise with writers organisations around the world to monitor new developments in the industry across the global arena. Screen Producers Ireland (SPI) Screen Producers Ireland (SPI) is a members organisation that promotes the growth and sustainability of a working environment conducive to a strong independent production sector. They strive to be an effective voice of independent film, television, animation and digital producers in Ireland by addressing the needs of the sector and using their knowledge and expertise to deliver a strong and sustainable position for their members. Their work includes; • A focus on shaping an independent production industry that is comparable to best international standards. • Encouraging state organisations charged with developing the industry to put in place development plans and policies for the sector to maximise potential. • Support of the continuance of the Irish Film and Television production tax incentive, Section 481. Identify potential improvements to the scheme and pursue Government to deliver on stated commitments. • Communicate and negotiate with industry stakeholders to include Broadcasters, Screen Ireland, The Broadcasting Authority of Ireland, Enterprise Ireland, Government Departments and other relevant Irish and international organisations. • Work to ensure that independent producers are provided with fair regulation across all broadcasting platforms. • Develop good communications with relevant unions representing employees in Film & TV Drama, to deliver effective and competitive collective agreements. • Host a broad range of industry seminars and events for members on current issues. National Campaign for the Arts (NCFA) The National Campaign for the Arts is a volunteer-led, grassroots movement that makes the case for the arts in Ireland. They work to ensure that the arts are on local and national government agendas and are recognised as a vital part of contemporary Irish life. Their work is continuous, and focuses on sectoral engagement, policy analysis and research, and advocacy. The group was established in 2009 and is made up of a Steering Group, a broader advisory group and working groups. The Steering Group is responsible for long-term strategy and its members focus on specific campaigns or research objectives. Their core objectives are : - To be a voice for the arts in Ireland, communicating the value of the arts and campaigning for continued and increased engagement with and investment in the arts - To work in partnership with the arts community, political representatives and other stakeholders to ensure Ireland values those working in the arts, providing a fertile and supportive environment for artists - To ensure that the arts make the fullest possible contribution to Irish society and its future - To get Ireland off the bottom of the Arts and Culture Investment League. Have government commit to an investment 0.3% of GDP over the lifetime of the next government, taking us halfway to the European average To achieve they aim to: - Capture the value of the arts in Ireland, working hand in hand with the arts sector, artists, the public, and Government - Work with others to build an evidence base that will inform policy and allow the arts to innovate and reach a wider audience - Build a deeper understanding of the mutual values of the arts and education and seek achievable means to embed the arts in education, working closely with educational partners - Ensure that everyone is Ireland can experience and participate in the arts
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

Broadcasting Authority Ireland (BAI)’s Statement of Strategy 2017 –19 Sound and Vision fund

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Broadcasting Authority Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The BAI captures the focus of its work in five overarching strategic themes as follows; 1. Promoting Diversity & Plurality 2. Achieving Excellence & Accountability 3. Communicating & Influencing 4. Empowering Audiences 5. Enhancing Innovation & Sectoral Sustainability The high level objectives related to the theme, Promoting Diversity & Plurality are; Strategic Objective 1 – Facilitate a mix of voices, opinions and sources of news and current affairs in audio-visual media which enhances democratic debate and active citizenship in Ireland Strategic Objective 2 – Increase the production and availability of culturally relevant audio-visual content for Irish audiences Strategic Objective 3 – Foster and promote quality programming in the Irish Language Strategic Objective 4 – Foster a media landscape that is representative of, and accessible to, the diversity of Irish society In order to achieve these objectives, the BAI will: • Continue to articulate an informed policy position on Media Plurality in Ireland that is supported by relevant research, and provide advices to the Minister as required • Develop and implement a revised Broadcasting Services Strategy that continues to facilitate dynamic licensing policies and plans and promotes quality programming in the Irish language • Continue to develop, implement and review broadcast funding schemes that support an increase in the production and availability of diverse, innovative and/or culturally relevant Irish audio-visual content, including content in the Irish language • Develop and implement and review an action plan that supports increased representation of the diversity of Irish society in the broadcast media with particular focus on gender and the Irish language
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In July 2020, the BAI announced its intention to operate an open funding round of the Sound and Vision 4 scheme which will see funding of up to €4.5m being made available and will be open to independent audiovisual producers, commercial, community and public service television stations, and independent audio producers working with commercial, community and public service radio stations. The open round is the third initiative to be announced by the BAI, in 2020, under the Sound & Vision 4 Scheme. In June, the BAI allocated €2.5m to independent commercial radio stations under the COVID-19 funding initiative. Earlier in July, the BAI opened the Community Radio Fund, which will see total funding of €750k being made available to BAI-licensed community, community of interest and community of special interest sound broadcasting services, and the special interest Christian / religious sound broadcasting service. In April, the BAI announced the award of over €7m in funding to facilitate the production of 126 projects across the audiovisual and audio sectors under the final round of the Sound & Vision 3 Scheme.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

2020 funding EU14.5m ($17m)

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

Screen Skills Ireland - Training and mentoring.

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Screen Skills Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Screen Skills Ireland is the leading agency with responsibility for investing in people and skills development for the screen sectors in Ireland. Now part of Fís Éireann/Screen Ireland, Screen Skills Ireland was established in 1995 to provide continuing training and career development opportunities for professionals working in the screen sectors. Screen Skills Ireland designs, develops and delivers industry-focused skills development initiatives for the screen sector in Ireland, encompassing film, TV, animation, games and VFX, for all roles from new entrants to company leaders. Core Values: Screen Skills Ireland’s core values are embedded in the work they do as follows: • providing skills development opportunities to our industry’s professionals throughout their career • offering strategic leadership for skills development within the screen sectors in Ireland • driving positive change within the sector through support for inclusivity, diversity, transparency and fairness in our work. • supporting the sector to grow and thrive across all regions nationally and internationally • collaborating with key stakeholders to provide skills development initiatives that respond to the changing needs of the sector Over the next 5 years Screen Skills Ireland will play a broader, more strategic leadership role in the development of skills for the screen sector in Ireland. They recently launched their 10 Point Action Plan 2020-2025, which outlines how Screen Skills Ireland will work collaboratively with stakeholders to follow through on this goal. 1. Increasing Industry Engagement 2. Developing Careers in Screen 3. Increasing Work-Based Learning Initiatives 4. Capturing Data and Outcomes 5. Increasing Mentoring Opportunities 6. Supporting Regional Production 7. Increasing Specialist Screen Schemes – Bursaries, Festivals & Networking 8. Supporting Career-Long Learning 9. Improving Screen Industry Culture 10. Increasing Screen Skills Funding
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Screen Skills Ireland developed and delivered over 47 courses in 2018 and allocated 628 places to participants. Of these training places, 58% were allocated to female participants and 42% allocated to male participants. Screen Skills Ireland also supported 23 masterclasses and workshops at leading Irish film festivals and seminars in partnership with various organisations throughout the year. Approximately 2,434 places were provided at these events throughout the country, and of these, 43% were allocated to female participants and 57% allocated to male participants. Through the Bursary Award Scheme, 25 Irish industry professionals availed of funding to attend high-level skills development programmes and workshops with international organisations. Screen Skills Ireland developed and delivered 78 courses in 2019 and allocated 1309 places to participants. Of these places, 59% were allocated to female participants and 41% were allocated to male participants. Screen Skills Ireland also supported 49 masterclasses and workshops at leading Irish film festivals and seminars in partnership with various organisations throughout the year. Through the Bursary Award Scheme, 29 Irish industry professionals availed of funding to attend highlevel skills development programmes and workshops with international organisations.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

Arts Council Initiatives to encourage Arts Participation

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Arts Council
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Diseño
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Arts Council understands arts participation to include a broad range of practice where individuals or groups collaborate with skilled artists to make or interpret art. Arts participation is a core value across all areas of the Arts Council's work, as they are committed to increasing public engagement in the arts in Ireland.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Arts Participation Arts participation is a core value for the Arts Council in its commitment to increasing public access, participation and engagement in the arts. It is broken down into five different strands, each with its own set of knowledge, expertise and cross-sector partnerships. These include: Arts and Health; Arts and Disability; Cultural Diversity and the Arts; Arts and Communities; and Arts and Older People. The Arts Council funds a number of key organisations and agencies that have a central role in supporting these strands of work. The Arts Council EHRD Policy 2019 In 2019 the Arts Council launched their Equality, Human Rights and Diversity (EHRD) Policy and Strategy which builds on their work areas in Arts and Disability, Cultural Diversity and Arts Policy and Dignity at Work. Through this policy they have committed to taking actions over the course of the coming years to actively deepen their understanding of inequalities in the arts and develop substantive ways to address them. Cultural Diversity The Arts Council understands the term ‘Cultural Diversity’, as it applies to the arts, to encompass inclusive arts programming and, most particularly, intercultural arts practice that involves artists and/or communities from a range of national, ethnic or cultural groups. The Arts Council offers a wide range of financial supports across artforms and arts practices, including those that actively promote cultural diversity and the arts. They include bursaries, projects, and travel and training awards as well as a specific strand in the Local Partnership Scheme, which aims to foster intercultural capacity at local and national level through strategic collaboration among local authorities and with arts and non-arts organisations. In addition, the Artist in the Community Scheme, which is externally managed by CSO Create, provides funding to enable artists and diverse groups to work alongside each other in the making of collaborative art. The Connect Mentoring Programme, an Arts Council-funded initiative developed by Create and Common Ground, included a specific arts and cultural diversity mentoring award. Arts and Disability Arts and Disability Connect (ADC) is a new scheme open to artists with disabilities working in any art form. The scheme is designed to support artists with disabilities to make new and ambitious work. It offers artists the opportunity to: connect with other practitioners or venues; make a change in their practice; ‘step up’ in terms of scope and scale; reach new audiences and to engage in mentoring and training. Arts and Health Arts and health embraces a range of arts practices occurring primarily in healthcare settings, which bring together the skills and priorities of both arts and health professionals. It can involve all artforms, and incorporate a variety of approaches, including conventional arts production and presentation, arts participation and environmental enhancement. Arts and Older People There are a number of agencies funded by the Arts Council which have a central role in supporting and encouraging older people to get involved in the arts. One such organisation is Age and Opportunity, which coordinates the Bealtaine Festival, an annual celebration of creativity in older age, which takes place around the country in May. Other Arts Council funding is channelled through venues, local authority arts officers, festivals, and production companies, many of which co-ordinate high-quality arts programmes directly targeting older people as participants and audiences. Arts and Communities The Arts Council offers a wide range of financial supports across artforms and arts practices, including arts and communities. These include bursaries, projects, and travel and training awards as well as specific schemes such as; artist in the community scheme; visual artists in prisons scheme; and writers in prisons scheme. Paying the Artist Policy 2020 The Arts Council launched the Paying the Artist Policy in 2020 in line with their commitment to improving the living and working conditions of the artist as set out in their Making Great Art Work Strategy. With this policy they seek to create an environment in which artists can make work of excellence and ambition and be remunerated appropriately. It provides a set of best-practice principles for all those working in the arts to aspire to. It asserts the Arts Council’s expectations of those they fund, of those they work with and of the Arts Council itself. The policy sets out a series of actions they will undertake across the areas of research, developmental activities, funding related requirements and advocacy. Other Initiatives ESRI Study The Arts Council commissioned a study, carried out by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), which looked at arts and cultural participation among children and young people. The study, entitled Arts and Cultural Participation among Children and Young People (Insights from the Growing Up in Ireland Study, was published in 2016 (http://www.artscouncil.ie/uploadedFiles/Arts-and-cultural-particiption-GUI.pdf). The knowledge gained from this report is fundamental in the Arts Council in planning and providing for children and young people. Arts in Education Portal The Arts in Education Portal (http://www.artsineducation.ie) was launched by the Arts Council in May 2015. This portal is a key national digital resource for arts and education practice in Ireland. Underpinning the development of the portal is a strong and implicit shared belief amongst all stakeholders of the intrinsic value of the arts in the lives of children. Its vision was to establish a structure through which the arts-in-education community could develop good collaborative practice and where arts education will be supported, developed and enhanced. Creative Schools Creative Schools is a flagship initiative of the Creative Ireland Programme and is led by the Arts Council. The initiative develops and celebrates the arts and creativity in schools in every region across the country. It establishes a range of collaborative opportunities for schools and develops and strengthens the relationships between schools and the broader cultural and community infrastructure within which they operate. The long term aim is for every school to be supported to fully embrace the arts and creativity, ensuring a positive experience and strong outcomes for children and young people. International Co-operation The Arts Council acknowledges that many Irish artists and arts organisations work, or plan to work, in an international context and in keeping with its’ ongoing policy of supporting international co-operation, the Arts Council oversees three distinct programmes of activity in the area of international arts: the Creative Europe Desk Ireland – Culture Office; the Venice Biennale; Mobility of Artists and the provision of awards to support international collaboration. In Ireland, the Creative Europe Desk comprises 3 offices: the Culture Office; MEDIA Office Dublin; and MEDIA Office Galway. The Arts Council is the designated host of the culture office, the role which is to promote the EU Creative Europe Programme 2014-2020 and to provide information, advice and technical assistance to any cultural operators in Ireland interested in applying for funding under the programme. In 2016, the Arts Council piloted a Co-funding Award to support the costs associated with the Irish elements of successful arts projects under the Creative Europe Programme. Following the success of this pilot initiative, the award is being offered on an annual basis and is serving to encourage important participation in the Creative Europe Programme. The Arts Council supports the mobility of artists and arts professionals and offers a Travel and Training Award across a broad range of artforms and practices. The primary purpose of the award is to support individuals who wish to avail of training and other professional development opportunities abroad. It also supports individuals or organisations who wish to invite specialists from abroad to deliver high-level training or mentoring in Ireland. Loan Guarantee Facility A negotiation is underway with key national stakeholders to progress with investment agreements between the Strategic Banking Cooperation of Ireland and the arts sector to provide a specific Loan Guarantee for the arts sector to avail of.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Create Ireland
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Age and Opportunity
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Bealtaine Festival
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Creative Europe Desks Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Goal 2 - Achieve a Balanced Flow of Cultural Goods and Services and Increase the Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Please indicate if the following policies and measures exist in your country: 
Policies and measures supporting the outward mobility of artists and cultural professionals (e.g. export offices, support for participation in international cultural markets for cultural professionals, etc.)
Please indicate if the following operational programmes have been developed or supported/funded by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Information resources or training services providing practical guidance to facilitate the mobility of cultural professionals (e.g. Internet platforms)
Infrastructure (e.g. arts residencies, cultural institutes, etc.) having a mandate to promote the diversity of cultural expressions and hosting a large number of foreign artists, notably from developing countries
Major cultural events (e.g. cultural seasons, festivals, cultural industries markets, etc.) having a mandate to promote the diversity of cultural expressions and hosting a large number of foreign artists, notably from developing countries
Please indicate if the following mobility funds (e.g. scholarships, travel grants, etc.) have been managed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Public funds supporting the outward mobility of national or resident artists and other cultural professionals
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Culture Ireland Travel Grants and support of annually funded bodies

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Culture Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Música
Las artes escénicas
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Culture Ireland provides grants to individual artists and arts organisations to assist with travel and travel related costs for the presentation of their work internationally
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In non COVID times Artists are assisted to travel to engage with national and international audiences and nowadays to present online also. Through Export Offices such as First Music Contact, Culture Ireland supports the presentation of Irish artists at high level international conferences and festivals.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

EU4.1m ($4.85m)

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Yes, ongoing internal and external evaluation proves that the funding provided is very beneficial to the artists and arts organisations in the promotion and presentation of Irish arts worldwide.

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
First Music Contact
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Literature Ireland
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Irish Arts Centre in New York
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Screen Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Making Great Art Work - Arts Council’s strategy for the arts in Ireland from 2016-2025

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Arts Council
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
International Co-operation The Arts Council acknowledges that many Irish artists and arts organisations work, or plan to work, in an international context and in keeping with its’ ongoing policy of supporting international co-operation, the Arts Council oversees three distinct programmes of activity in the area of international arts: the Creative Europe Desk Ireland – Culture Office; the Venice Biennale; Mobility of Artists and the provision of awards to support international collaboration. In Ireland, the Creative Europe Desk comprises 3 offices: the Culture Office; MEDIA Office Dublin; and MEDIA Office Galway. The Arts Council is the designated host of the culture office, the role which is to promote the EU Creative Europe Programme 2014-2020 and to provide information, advice and technical assistance to any cultural operators in Ireland interested in applying for funding under the programme. In 2016, the Arts Council piloted a Co-funding Award to support the costs associated with the Irish elements of successful arts projects under the Creative Europe Programme. Following the success of this pilot initiative, the award is being offered on an annual basis and is serving to encourage important participation in the Creative Europe Programme. The Arts Council supports the mobility of artists and arts professionals and offers a Travel and Training Award across a broad range of artforms and practices. The primary purpose of the award is to support individuals who wish to avail of training and other professional development opportunities abroad. It also supports individuals or organisations who wish to invite specialists from abroad to deliver high-level training or mentoring in Ireland.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Creative Europe Desks Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Individual artists
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Galway 2020 - European Capital of Culture 2020

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Galway 2020 Cultural Development and Activity Company
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Galway is Ireland's 2020 European Capital of Culture. The objectives of Galway 2020 are to: regenerate the cultural life of Galway city and county and spread its influence across Europe; re-open our eyes to the immense cultural landscaper of Galway and of Europe; re-energise communities that have been undermined by economic decline and migration; and. re-instil a confidence in the power of culture to shape our lived environment. The cultural programme for Galway 2020 is structured according to the three themes of: - Migration: celebrating the diversity of cultures in Europe on the backdrop of Galway City and County; - Landscape: at the Western Edge of Europe, Galway is collaborating with its European partners to challenge and engage citizens in 2020 across its rural and the marine landscape; and, Language: promoting the variety of languages spoken in Europe and in Galway, language will feature in projects and encourage the acceptance and use of many languages.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Galway 2020 European Capital of Culture has been in development over a number of years with many events taking place in the period 2017-2019. Galway 2020 was just over a month into its official designation as 2020 European Capital of Culture when public health restrictions were introduced. Up to this point, many events including musical performances, talks with leading authors and a major exhibition for children on the Irish language had taken place with many of these events involving European and international artists. While the cultural programme has been restructured as a result of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on public events and gatherings, many projects are still proceeding mainly through online platforms and limited physical attendance. Over two thirds of the projects proceeding under the cultural programme involve international artists who have worked closely with Irish artists over a number of years to develop and now deliver.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

Central Government funding: EU15m ($17.5m)
Local Government funding: EU9.5m ($11m)

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Galway City Council
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Galway County Council
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
European Commission
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Flow of Cultural Goods and Services

Export strategies or measures to support the distribution of cultural goods and services outside your country exist for the following cultural domains: 
-
Your country has granted or benefited from preferential treatment* to support a balanced exchange of cultural goods and services in the last 4 years: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Your country has provided or benefited in the last 4 years from Aid for Trade support, a form of Official Development Assistance (ODA), that helped to build capacities to formulate trade policies, participate in negotiating and implementing agreements that provide a special status to cultural goods and services: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Tratados y acuerdos

Multilateral or bilateral trade and/or investment agreements providing a special status to cultural goods and/or services have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negociation: 
YES
Multilateral or bilateral agreements including specific provisions providing a special status to cultural goods and services and digital products in the field of e-commerce have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negotiation: 
NO
Multilateral or bilateral agreements, declarations and/or strategies on relevant policy issues for the diversity of cultural expressions (e.g. education, digital, intellectual property, sustainable development, gender equality, etc.) signed or amended to take into account the objectives or principles of the Convention during the last 4 years: 
NO
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Revised European Convention on Cinematographic Co-Production (ETS No 220)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The revised European Convention on Cinematographic Co-Production (ETS No 220), adopted on 29 June 2016 and opened for signature by member states and for accession by non-member states and the European Community on 30 January 2017, was signed on behalf of Ireland in May 2019, entering into force for Ireland on 1 September 2019.

Goal 3 - Integrate Culture in Sustainable Development Frameworks

National Sustainable Development Policies & Plans

National sustainable development plans and strategies recognize the strategic role of: 
Culture (in general)
Please rate from 1 to 4 the type of outcomes expected by the inclusion of culture in national sustainable development plans and strategies 1 most often expected outcome 4 least expected outcome): 
Economic (e.g. employment, trade, intellectual property, cultural and creative industries, rural and territorial development): 
2
Social (e.g. social cohesion and inclusion, inequality and poverty reduction, values and identity, vulnerable and minority groups, empowerment and human capital, education): 
1
Environmental (e.g. natural resources, reducing environmental impact of cultural industries and practices): 
2
Cultural (e.g. cultural infrastructure, participation and access to culture, innovation, artists support): 
1
Public cultural bodies and agencies responsible for culture or creative industries are involved in the design and implementation of sustainable development policies and plans (i.e. participate in coordination mechanisms such as joint planning committees): 
YES
Cultural industry-led regeneration initiatives and projects at the regional, urban and/or rural levels have been implemented in the last 4 years: 
YES
Policies and measures facilitate participation in cultural life and access to diverse cultural facilities and expressions, notably addressing the needs of disadvantaged or vulnerable groups (e.g. via reduced entrance fees; audience development, arts education and audiences awareness-raising): 
YES
Latest data on cultural participation rates by socio demographic variables (sex/age groups/rural- urban/income levels/education levels): 
Ireland Cultural Participation Rates Sex M F Cinema 45.9% 51.5% Live performance 40.9% 48.6% Cultural sites 40.8% 39.1% Age 16-29: 85% 30-64: 70% 65-74:70% Income levels First (lowest) quintile: 45% Second quintile: 60% Third quintile: 70% Fourth quintile: 80% Fifth (highest) quintile: 90% Education Lower secondary or less: 40% Upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary: 70% Tertiary: 80%
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

The Regional Film Development Uplift

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Government of Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
A key challenge in promoting the audiovisual sector across Ireland is the additional costs of filming outside the key urban areas (and particularly the Dublin area). Measures are underway to address this imbalance in the hope of unlocking access to a wider variety of locations than presently exist and to develop skills and crews across regional locations in Ireland. This supports the National Development Plan 2018 - 2027 which aims to drive Ireland’s long term economic, environmental and social progress across all parts of the country over the next decade. In July 2019, the Film (Regional Film Development Uplift) (Amendment) Regulations 2019 were published giving effect to the Regional Film Development Uplift (“Regional Uplift”) measure which was announced as part of Budget 2019. The measure was subject to EU State aid approval and on receipt of this approval, commenced with effect from 17 July 2019. This will contribute to the strategic aims of building the audiovisual industry in regions outside of the areas in which it is currently concentrated by providing for an additional tax credit (in addition to the standard 32% tax credit) to be made available to productions being substantially undertaken in “assisted regions”. “Assisted regions” are areas designated as such under the Regional Aid Guidelines (RAGs) map. In addition, to qualify for the relief, producer companies will be required to show that training and skills development opportunities are provided to individuals habitually resident in the area and that such training will address a skills deficit in the area. Following changes announced in Budget 2021, the Regional Uplift will be available for 5 years with 5% additional tax credit available in 2019, 2020 and 2021, 3% in 2022, and 2% in 2023. The aid is to provide additional support to incentivise the development of the audiovisual sector in areas outside the current main production hubs which should ensure a more equal spread of production activity across the country and contribute towards stimulating the growth of audiovisual activity in new regions in Ireland
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO

Free or reduced prince access to Cultural Venues

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Tourism Culture Arts Gaeltacht Sport and Media; National Cultural Institutions; State Bodies
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Música
Las artes escénicas
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Free access to Ireland’s National Cultural Institutions and National Parks. Reduced price tickets to theatre and the Concert Hall for certain demographics including students and unwaged. Ireland’s National Theatre – the Abbey Theatre – operates a ‘Free First Previews Scheme where all tickets on the night are free and operate on a first come first served basis
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The public enjoy free access to Ireland's National Cultural Institutions such as the National Library, National Museum, National Gallery, Crawford Art Gallery and Irish Museum of Modern Art, as well as all National Parks and Nature Reserves. Free and reduced price tickets for theatrical performances and concerts consistently prove popular among the public with widespread take up.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
National Museum of Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
National Gallery of Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
National Library of Ireland
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Irish Museum of Modern Art
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Crawford Art Gallery
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Chester Beatty Library
Name of partner: 
Abbey Theatre
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
National Concert Hall
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Engaging the Public on Climate Change through the Cultural and Creative Sectors

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Creative Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
A new initiative, based on a research paper commissioned by Creative Ireland and published in 2020, setting out work and projects undertaken by the cultural and creative sector in recent years that address the issue of climate change and making recommendations for how the sector can consider further work in this area and the opportunities that the Department of Tourism Culture Arts Gaeltacht Sport and Media could create to support this work. Recommendations include: - Providing Direct Support - Building Partnerships and Supporting Collaborations - Advocacy at Policy level - Developing Capacity of the Cultural and Creative Sectors
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO

International Cooperation for Sustainable Development

Your country has contributed to or benefited from the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) during the last 4 years: 
-
Development cooperation strategies, including South-South cooperation strategies, recognize the strategic role of creativity and diverse cultural expressions: 
-
If YES, please provide the name(s) of the strategy and year(s) of adoption: 
-
Your country manages multi- and/or bilateral technical assistance and capacity building cooperation programmes supporting: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Goal 4 - Promote Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

Gender Equality

Ministries, governmental agencies and/or parliamentary bodies in charge of gender equality: 
Exist and are relevant for artists and cultural professionals
Policies and measures to support the full participation of women in cultural life have been implemented during the last 4 years: 
YES
Policies and measures have been adopted to support the recognition and advancement of women as artists, cultural professionals and/or creative entrepreneurs, (e.g. ensure equal pay for equal work or equal access to funding, coaching or mentoring schemes, anti-discrimination measures, etc.): 
YES
Data is regularly collected and disseminated to monitor: 
Gender equality in the culture and media sectors
Participation of women in cultural life
Percentage of total public funds given to female artists and cultural producers: 
63.00%
2019
Percentage of women/men in decision-making /managerial positions in public and private cultural and media: 
In relation to Arts Sector in 2017 report: 55% of senior executive positions in publicly funded arts organisations were held by women. 33% of voluntary Chairpersons roles in organisations were held by women. • In relation to arts organisations’ Boards make-up (a key change objective in Arts Council’s EHRD policy) in 2019: - 53% of boards were gender balanced (comprised of ratios between 60:40 M:F to 60:40 F:M) - 19 % had 50:50 ratio M:F. - 24% had higher female representation > 60% female board membership - 22% had higher male representation > 60% Male board membership (Note: data based on hetero-normative assumptions about gender – new gender fields have been added to Arts Council forms to have clear and accurate information about gender forthwith). Percentage of works from female/male artists displayed / projected in important festivals of the arts and cultural industries (film, book publishing, music industry etc.)
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Screen Ireland Six Point Plan on Gender Equality

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Screen Ireland
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Screen Ireland (SI) is committed to supporting and facilitating an increase in the level of female writers, producers and directors in line with its Six Point Plan on Gender Equality. 2019 built on the ongoing efforts to support increased female participation for the last number of years and the aim is that 2020 will see a further increase. The POV Production and Training Scheme for female talent is aimed at delivering on Screen Ireland’s commitment to achieving 50/50 gender parity within the Irish screen industries both in front of and behind the camera. This scheme provides funding and training specifically for female initiated and driven films. In 2020, 4 POV projects will go into production. Screen Ireland will continue to offer enhanced production funding for female initiated and driven feature films. 15 projects have been selected from 195 applications for the Spotlight scheme. Out of these projects, 53% have female writers attached. This scheme was specifically targeted at diverse and underrepresented voices and this is reflected in the choice of projects. Linking funding decisions to greater gender equality is already paying dividends and provides a positive model to replicate in other areas of strategic importance to the industry. In order to incentivise and reward positive change and support the industry in a continued and sustained era of growth, it is the intention of Screen Ireland to develop funding criteria for productions based on the following guiding principles; equality, diversity and inclusion, career & skills development, dignity in the workplace, and climate and sustainability. Screen Ireland have created several new schemes to help production companies during the Covid-19 crisis. Within the applications, producers are asked to supply a statement of diversity, inclusion, and gender to emphasise the importance of working with a diverse team.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Screen Ireland’s target of a 5% increase for 2019 was met. A target of a 5% year on year increase has also been set for 2020. In Q1 2020 (most recent stats), 40 applications had female talent attached (excluding producers) which is at the same level as the total applications in 2019. The number of successful applications with female talent attached (excluding producers) was 17 which is 3% lower than the total stats for 2019. Screen Ireland remains confident that the 2020 targets will be achieved.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Screen Ireland with producer companies
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Citizens’ Assembly on gender equality

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Citizens’ Assembly
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Dr. Catherine Day, former Secretary General of the European Commission chairs Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly to advance gender equality. The Assembly has been asked to bring forward proposals that: • challenge the remaining barriers and social norms and attitudes that facilitate gender discrimination towards girls and boys, women and men; • identify and dismantle economic and salary norms that result in gender inequalities, and reassess the economic value placed on work traditionally held by women; • seek to ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in the workplace, politics and public life; • recognise the importance of early years parental care and seek to facilitate greater work-life balance; • examine the social responsibility of care and women and men’s co-responsibility for care, especially within the family; and • scrutinise the structural pay inequalities that result in women being disproportionately represented in low pay sectors. The Assembly will report to the Houses of the Oireachtas (Irish Parliament) which, on receipt of the Report, will refer it for consideration to a relevant Committee of both Houses.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In January 2020, the Citizen’s Assembly on Gender Equality held its inaugural meeting. This was followed by a meeting on gender stereotypes and the family in February. A public consultation process was initiated to seek views/recommendations on the following themes; • Gender norms and stereotypes • Work: Occupational segregation by gender, gender discrimination and the gender pay gap • Care, paid and unpaid, as a social and family responsibility • Women’s access to, and representation in, public life and decision making • Where does gender inequality impact most? Responses to the public consultation will be taken into consideration in the development of the agenda for Assembly weekends and as part of the Citizens' deliberations. An online seminar for citizens was held on Saturday 4th July 2020 to provide them with an opportunity to reconnect with each other, and to give initial consideration to the public submissions and how Covid 19 has impacted on their mandate. The Assembly met virtually on the 17th October 2020. This meeting focussed on the following topic from the Oireachtas resolution to ‘seek to ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in the workplace, politics and public life.’ The meeting included various speakers discussing topics including; • Gender Equality, leadership & politics • Gender Balance in Elected Office in Europe • Women in Media And included panel discussions on; • Leadership case studies and suggested recommendations • Possible policy changes

Report of the Inter-Departmental Group on Gender Balance on State Boards - Options and Recommendations for Government

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Government Departments
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
In 2011 the Irish Government introduced new arrangements to increase openness and transparency in the selection of appointees to State Boards and in 2014 published guidelines setting out requirements which would apply to all State Board appointments. These guidelines incorporate the long standing target to achieve 40% representation of women and of men on State Boards. With a view to accelerating progress in achieving this target, the Government agreed in 2018 to the convening of an inter-departmental group to identify and report on best practices which could be adopted across Government. The interdepartmental group published their report in March 2019. The Ministers would then bring the report to Government with recommendations on actions to be taken by Government departments and agencies and an accompanying implementation plan. The purpose of the Inter-Departmental group were set out in its terms of reference, as follows: • identify best practices (whether already in use in Departments or not) aimed at accelerating progress towards the target of 40% representation of each gender on all State boards, considering measures mentioned in Action 4.7 of the National Strategy for Women and Girls such as engagement with external nominating bodies and awareness raising among eligible groups of women; • consider how such practices could be mainstreamed across Government Departments and public bodies; • recommend actions in respect of those practices that could be taken by Government Departments and public bodies; and • propose an implementation plan to give effect to its recommendations. Four key themes emerged from discussions of the group, and these provided a focus for the Inter-Departmental Group’s subsequent work: • Measures were needed to encourage women to apply for Board positions in greater numbers. • The Inter-Departmental Group would consider ways to encourage consideration of gender representation in appointing board members and chairpersons. • Low representation of women among candidates put forward by nominating bodies and among ex-officio appointments needed to be addressed. • The Inter-Departmental Group would also consider ways to encourage further engagement by Departments with nominating bodies with a view to increase the diversity and skills mix more broadly on State Boards, which indirectly could contribute to greater gender balance.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Public Appointments Service (PAS) which operates under the Guidelines on Appointments to State Boards has played a positive role, with the PAS process achieving 51% of appointments to female candidates in 2018 and 53% since the establishment of the process in 2014. The PAS State Boards process is constantly evolving, developing stronger recognition of the State Boards brand in key sectors with a focus on gender and regional representation across candidate pools. As a direct result of this engagement process, we have seen an increase in the number of women applying for vacancies on State Boards. The Inter-Departmental Group on Gender Balance on State Boards have published their Report which includes the following conclusions; • Targeted actions by Government Departments, external nominating bodies, the Public Appointments Service and by chairs and members of State Boards should enable all State boards to achieve the 40% target for gender balanced Board membership. • the achievement of better gender balance on State Boards will require Government Departments and Public Agencies to give greater visibility to this requirement both so that external nominating bodies are aware of it when nominating potential candidates and so that eligible women have greater awareness of potential vacancies. Following consideration by Government of its recommendations, the Department of Justice will prepare an implementation plan, in consultation with the State Board Liaison Officers of each Department, of actions to be implemented by all relevant public bodies. The Inter-Departmental Group concluded that implementation of the following recommendations would address the factors which are leading to gender imbalances in the membership of certain State Boards and provided suggested approaches under each of the headings; • Reporting • Outreach • Terms and Conditions • Highlight Gender Balance when making appointments • Governance and Culture • Nominations by external nominating bodies • Emphasis diversity and skills mix on Boards • Training Interventions

Equality Human Rights & Diversity Policy – The Arts Council

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Arts Council
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Diseño
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The policy (launched March 2018) outlines the Arts Council’s determination to proactively combat discrimination and address exclusion in the arts in Ireland, with reference to ten grounds of discrimination, of which gender is one. It is accompanied by an initial 3-year action plan where there are several general actions that have bearing for gender inequality and two specific gender related ones: 1. Publish aggregate information on award applicants and recipients with an immediate focus on gender and in the long-term further fields as appropriate. 2. Require Strategically Funded organisations to ensure their boards are gender balanced. Data is being collected and published on both these actions.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In terms of individual awards there has always been a higher number of female applicants and recipients. However, there has tended to be gender dominance within specific artforms (e.g Music, Traditional arts). Since the introduction of the policy there has been a positive shift in this dominant trend but it will need to be assessed over some years.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

c EU175,000

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

Libertad artística

The constitution and/or national regulatory frameworks formally acknowledge: 
-
Independent bodies are established to receive complaints and/or monitor violations and restrictions to artistic freedom: 
YES
Initiatives to protect artists at risk or in exile have been developed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years (e.g. providing safe houses, guidance and training, etc.): 
NO
Measures and initiatives intended to ensure transparent decision-making on government funding/ state grants and awards for artists exist (e.g. through independent committees, etc.): 
YES
Social protection measures that take the professional status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. health insurance, retirement schemes, unemployment benefits, etc.): 
YES
Economic measures that take the status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. collective agreements, income tax and other regulatory frameworks, etc.): 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Professional Artists on Jobseeker’s Allowance

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Department of Social Protection
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
In 2019, the Government announced the extension, on a permanent basis, of a pilot social welfare scheme to self-employed artists including those working in the performing arts, film and architecture. The expanded scheme recognises the unique creative circumstances of artists in receipt of Jobseeker’s Allowance. From September 2019, self-employed artists in receipt of Jobseeker’s Allowance for the first year they are out of work will now be able to focus on their artistic efforts and develop their portfolio, rather than having to participate in the normal labour market to make ends meet. This scheme was designed to make it easier for writers and artists to access Jobseeker’s Allowance during times when their incomes are low and to provide support to develop income opportunities. This new professional status is a real and symbolic recognition of the status of professional artists in Ireland and recognises their contribution to Irish culture within the state support systems. Artists eligible to apply include actors, theatre and film directors, dancers, opera singers, set, costume and lighting designers, musicians, composers, choreographers, architects and street performers.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The review of the pilot scheme (which had a more limited eligibility criteria) revealed that over 100 artists and writers availed of the scheme. Analysis showed that the vast majority of the artists on the pilot, (over 87%) who subsequently exited from the Jobseekers Allowance scheme do so within the first year. Feedback from the organisations representing visual artists and writers was positive. It was clear to them that the State recognises the vital contribution professional artists make to Irish society but also understands the economic hardships many artists face as periods of unemployment can be a typical feature for them as they try to build up their work. As a result of the review findings it was decided that the scheme will be established as a permanent scheme in its own right and will include other professional artistic disciplines. The derogation from activation for the first 12 months will help the artists to exit Jobseekers Allowance having had the opportunity to grow their self-employment in their artistic field.
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Department of Social Protection
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
Visual Arts Ireland
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Actors Equity/SIPTU
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Irish Writers Centre
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Musicians Union of Ireland/SIPTU
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Dance Ireland
Name of partner: 
Writers Guild of Ireland
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Screen Directors Guild of Ireland
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Irish Street Arts, Circus & Spectacle Network
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

Measures and Initiatives reported by Civil Society Organizations

Describe how the CSO form has been used to promote collaboration with CSOs in the preparation of this report, including the distribution of the form and the modalities of collection and analysis of the information received. Please indicate the percentage of measures and initiatives received that have been considered as relevant by the Party and included in the QPR.: 
-
GOAL 1 - Support sustainable systems of governance for culture: 
-
GOAL 2 - Achieve a balanced flow of cultural goods and services and increase the mobility of artists and cultural professionals: 
-
GOAL 3 - Integrate culture in sustainable development frameworks: 
-
GOAL 4 - Promote human rights and fundamental freedoms: 
-
On the basis of the analysis of the responses provided through the CSO form, present up to ten main priorities of CSOs to implement the Convention over the next four years.: 
-

Emerging Transversal Issues

Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Challenges and Achievements

Describe the main results achieved to implement the Convention (at least one major achievement in one of the four goals): 
The publication of Culture 2025 - Ireland's First National Cultural Policy Framework and the development and implementation of its central programme - the all of Government Creative Ireland Programme - are undoubtedly the main achievements to implement the Convention in the past four years. The Creative Ireland programme through its five pillars, supports sustainable governance systems, fosters mobility of artists and cultural professionals and promotes sustainable communities and creativity in education.
Describe the main challenges encountered to implement the Convention and the main solutions found or envisaged to overcome them: 
The main challenges to implement the Convention include the fulfilment of many ambitious targets for the cultural and creative sector, particularly in light of the severe impact that COVID-19 has brought on all plans for 2020. These challenges are being addressed through increased financial supports for the cultural and creative sector, as well as sustained dialogue and consultation with all stakeholders, including representative civil society organisations, on the way forward.
Describe the steps planned in the next four years to further implement the Convention and the priority areas identified for future policy action based on the conclusions of the current reporting process: 
The next four years will involve fulfilling existing commitments, many of which are outlined in this report, as well as supporting the cultural and creative sector to bounce back from the impact of COVID-19. There will also be increased focus on ensuring that culture is reflected as an expression of and enabler of sustainable development. Finally, there will be consideration of measures to enhance awareness raising of the Convention.

Annexes

Please upload relevant documents (law, policy, agreement, regulation, strategy, etc.), studies and statistics in PDF format related to the implementation of the 4 goals and the 11 areas of monitoring of the Convention in your country. The documents should have been produced during the reporting period covered by this periodic report. Please provide the title and a description of the main content of the document in English or French.: 

Submission

Designated official signing the report: 
Title: 
Ms.
First name: 
Sinéad
Family name: 
O'Hara
Organization: 
Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media
Position: 
Head of International Cultural Policy
Date of submission: 
2020
Electronic Signature: