Quadrennial Periodic Report
Noruega 2020

Quadrennial Periodic Report - hvinje - 07/01/2020 - 14:04

General Information

Technical Information

Name of Party: 
Noruega
Date of Ratification: 
2007
Officially Designated Point of Contact of the Convention: 
Describe the multi-stakeholder consultation process established for the preparation of this report, including consultations with relevant ministries, public institutions, local governments and civil society organizations.: 

The Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs has contributed to the report. The Norwegian National Commission for UNESCO, which acts as a link between civil society and the Government, has also been invited to participate in the drafting of this report. The Commission has also been invited to comment on a draft version.

Executive summary: 

As stated in Norway's first and second periodic quadrennial reports, submitted in 2012 and 2016, Norwegian cultural policy is considered to be inherently in line with the Convention and its spirit, and no specific measures with the explicit, stated aim of implementing the Convention are implemented as such. Instead, the totality of various cultural policy measures and initiatives contribute both directly and indirectly to its implementation, without necessarily using it as an explicit or specific reference. This has been the case with Norwegian cultural policies since the 1970s; the Convention did not precede their formulation. The Convention is however subject to a continued and strong commitment and constitutes a highly pertinent and relevant framework and point of reference, especially in international cooperation.

The reporting period examined in this report saw the presentation of the Government's first comprehensive White Paper on cultural policy since 2003. In the new White Paper, which was presented to the Parliament in December 2018 after a substantial, open and inclusive process involving close dialogue with the cultural sector, civil society organisations and other stakeholders, the Norwegian Government highlighted the inherent contribution of art and culture to human rights and a thriving democracy and renewed its strong commitment to actively promoting the freedom of speech and expression, including the freedom of artistic expression. These are key priorities also for the Government's commitment to international cooperation in arts and culture.

They key objective for Norwegian cultural policy and the national implementation of the Convention is to ensure a free and independent cultural sector that creates artistic and cultural expressions of the highest quality; that promotes education and critical reflection; that safeguards and disseminates cultural heritage; that creates and disseminates a cultural offer that is perceived as relevant and representative of the population; that is accessible to everyone and that encourages individuals to experience and take part in cultural activities; that offers meeting places and builds communities; that renews itself and demonstrates a capacity of change and transformation; that has international impact and promotes intercultural dialogue; and that strengthens Norwegian language, the Sami languages, the national minority languages and Norwegian Sign Language as fundamental bearers of culture.

The Government's stated aim is to ensure a cultural life where a diversity of actors provide varied arts and cultural experiences to as many people as possible. The Government aims to strengthen the independent and fringe cultural sector and to encourage innovation in the field of art and culture. It is important that artists and cultural workers enjoy access to good and stable grant schemes. Arts and cultural institutions that contribute to strenghtening cultural diversity will be prioritised.

The Norwegian Government views the development and implementation of media policies in close connection with cultural policy, and is strongly committed to facilitating a broad and enlightened public discourse in the entire country.

Emerging and existing challenges, measures and initiatives are continually under review and development through monitoring and evaluation initiatives as well as consultations with stakeholders, government authorities and civil society organisations.

We also refer to the numerous measures and initiatives described in Norway's first (2012) and second (2016) quadrennial periodic reports. The majority of these are still in operation and under implementation, but are not described in the present report. For reasons of clarity, monetary amounts are listed in Norwegian Kroner (NOK) with the exception of the total public budget for culture.

Contact details of the stakeholders involved in the preparation of the quadrennial periodic report (QPR). Please also include the contact details of the civil society organizations (CSOs) if they have contributed to the QPR drafting, including through the CSO form.: 
Organization typeOrganizationEmailWebsite
Public Sector
Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
post@mfa.no
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Norwegian National Commission for UNESCO
natcom@unesco.no

Goal 1 - Support Sustainable Systems of Governance for Culture

Cultural and Creative Sectors

A Ministry (or agency with ministerial status) is responsible for cultural and creative sectors: 
YES
Regional, provincial or local governments or administrations have decentralised responsibilities for policies and measures promoting the cultural and creative sectors:: 
YES
Regulatory frameworks and sector specific laws, policies and/or strategies supporting the cultural and creative industries have been revised or adopted during the last 4 years: 
YES
If YES, has at least one of them been designed through interministerial cooperation (involving different government departments responsible for policy areas, such as communication, education, ICT, trade, foreign affairs, labor, finance): 
YES
Specific education and training programmes in the arts and the cultural and creative sectors are established, including: 
Technical and vocational education and training programmes in
Cultural management
Tertiary and university education degrees in
Cinema/audiovisual arts
Cultural management
Design
Digital cultural and creative sectors
Media arts
Music
Performing arts
Publishing
Visual arts
Specific measures and programmes have been implemented over the last 4 years to: 
Support job creation in the cultural and creative sectors
Encourage the formalization and growth of micro/small and medium-sized cultural enterprises
Statistical offices or research bodies have produced data during the last 4 years: 
related to cultural and creative sectors
evaluating cultural policies
Share of cultural and creative sectors in Gross Domestic Product (GDP): 
3.00%
2014
Share of employment in the cultural and creative sectors: 
3.00%
2018
Total public budget for culture (in USD): 
1,457,449,000USD
2020
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

White Paper on Cultural Policy: The Power of Culture – Cultural Policy for the Future. Report no. 8 (2018-2019) to the Storting (Meld. St. 8 (2018–2019) Kulturens kraft – kulturpolitikk for framtida)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Diseño
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The White Paper confirms Norway's cultural policy goals: A vibrant democracy where all citizens are free to express themselves, and where diversity, creative power and creativity are highly valued. An inclusive society where art and culture of the highest quality inspire, unite us and teach us about ourselves and our surroundings. The general cultural policy objective described in the White Paper is a free and independent cultural sector that • produces artistic and cultural expressions of the highest quality • fosters education and critical reflection • protects and disseminates cultural heritage • creates and disseminates a cultural offering that is viewed as relevant, and which represents the population • is available to everyone and encourages each person to experience and participate in cultural activities • provides meeting places and builds communities • transforms itself and shows an ability to transform • has an international impact and fosters intercultural understanding • strengthens the Norwegian language, the Sami languages, the national minority languages, and the Norwegian sign language as fundamental bearers of culture
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The policies are currently under implementation.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

Governmental expenditure on cultural purposes in the Norwegian Ministry of Culture's budget for 2018 was NOK 14 billion (the corresponding figure in the county authorities and local authorities was NOK 1.6 billion and NOK 12.9 billion respectively).

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The White Paper provides the overarching and cross-cutting priorities for the Government's cultural policies. These are implemented by a wide range of government and public authorities, such as different line ministries and the Norwegian Ministry of Cultu
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

The new Copyright Act of 15 June 2018

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Diseño
Medios de comunicación
Música
Las artes escénicas
Industria editorial
Artes visuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The new Copyright Act is based on a Green Paper presented by the Norwegian Ministry of Culture: https://www.regjeringen.no/no/dokumenter/prop.-104-l-20162017/id2547943/ (In Norwegian) The new Act simplifies and modernizes copyright provisions with the aim to make them easier to apply for all users. The Act maintains the balance between the interests of rights holders on the one hand and the interests of users and the public on the other. It also improves the rights of artists in several areas, including the following: • A new, unwaivable right to fair remuneration when rights are transferred. This secures a fairer share of income for the artists that create copyrighted works and later decide to transfer the rights to others. • A new interpretative measure to ensure that when an artist transfers the rights of a copyrighted work or performance, that transfer should only include the rights clearly included in the agreement. This shall ensure that the agreement should be interpreted in favour of the artist. • The copyright enforcement measures (sanctions and damages) are strengthened and there are proposed new measures regarding streaming from an illegal source. Artists and other right holders have asked for this reform.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The aim of the new act has amongst other been to simplify and modernize the Norwegian copyright provisions, and hopefully the new act is easier to apply for all users. Although the new act is quite up to date, it soon has to be amended again due to the implementation of the two new EU Directives under the DSM agenda: (EU) 2019/789 and (EU) 2019/790.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

N/A

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Regulations on Financial Incentives for the Production of Films and Series in Norway (also called the Incentive Scheme).

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Scheme grants up to 25 % return on costs spent in Norway to productions produced partly or entirely in Norway that are intended for international distribution. The purpose of the incentive scheme is to increase the number of international films and series produced in Norway to promote Norwegian culture, history and nature. The scheme is also designed to improve the experience and skills of the Norwegian film industry, stimulate growth, promote a sustainable Norwegian film industry and support international cooperation.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Norwegian Film Institute allocated 226 mill. NOK from the incentive scheme in the period 2016-2019.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

The Norwegian Film Institute allocated 297,4 million NOK from the incentive scheme in the period 2016-2020.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

Menon Economics recently carried out an assignment, comissioned by The Norwegian Ministry of Culture, concerning the puclic schemes for audiovisual production. The incentive scheme was part of this evaluation.

Furthermore, Olsberg SPI performed an early evaluation of the insentive scheme inn 2017, assigned by the Norwegian Film Institute.

Menon Economics concluded (2019) that the incentive scheme is not currently directly relevant for promoting domestic culture, history and nature. The scheme might have extended effects like increased purchases of goods and services in Norway. However, such effects are not suffiently proved, especially concerning the gain for domestic audiovisual industry and related suppliers.

Menon Economics argued for a growing need to support domestic productions that are internationally oriented, rather than supporting foreign productions in Norway. On this ground, Menon Economics reccommended altering the scheme in a such a way that it should aim more at domestic productions that are internationally distributed.

The early study by Olsberg SPI (2017) assessed the scheme based on grants given in 2016, and estimated that these (two) productions generated a total of 198 million NOK in Norway, employed 142 full time equivalents (FTE) and 33,3 million NOK tax revenues. Olsberg SPI concluded that an incentive scheme with a limited ammount of grants and a narrow application period most likely will lose in competition with automatic incentive scemes in comparable countries.

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Norwegian Film Institute
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

The National Book Year 2019 (Bokåret 2019)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
National Library of Norway
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Industria editorial
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The National Book Year 2019 aimed to contribute to the development of public libraries as meeting places, cultural institutions and arenas for conversation and debate, learning and democracy. An important goal was to create enthusiasm and interest in books and literature, and renew people's desire to read.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Around 1500 events were held in all municipalities throughout the country. There were events of all sorts not only at libraries, but also at schools, in bookstores, at festivals and cultural centres.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

27 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK)

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The National Library allocated the financial means to libraries and other institutions all over the country. More than 500 libraries and other institutions were engaged in the measure.
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Media Diversity

Public service media has a legal or statutory remit to promote a diversity of cultural expressions: 
YES
Policies and measures promote content diversity in programming by supporting: 
Regional and/or local broadcasters
Linguistic diversity in media programming
Community programming for marginalised groups (e.g. indigenous peoples, migrants and refugees, etc.)
Socio-cultural programming (e.g. children, youth, people with disabilities, etc.)
Domestic content regulations for audio-visual media exist (e.g. quotas for production or distribution requirements for national films, TV series or music on radio): 
YES
Regulatory authority(ies) monitoring media exist: 
YES
If YES, please provide the name and year of establishment of the regulatory authority(ies): 
Norwegian Media Authority (Medietilsynet), 2005
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) monitor: 
Public media
Community media
Private sector media
Online media
If YES, these regulatory authority(ies) are responsible for: 
Issuing licenses to broadcasters, content providers, platforms
Monitoring cultural (including linguistic) obligations
Monitoring diversity in media ownership (diversity of ownership structures, transparency of ownership rules, limits on ownership concentration, etc.)
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Act relating to Transparency of Media Ownership

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Media Authority
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Collecting, systematizing and publishing information about the ownership structure in Norwegian media
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
N/A

Proposal on Act relating to Editorial Independence and Responsibility of Editor-controlled Journalistic Media (the Media Liability Act)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
N/A
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Bill updates and gathers currently applicable special rules on liability in the media field, and introduces a number of new legislative provisions – including on duty to appoint and identify an editor, editorial independence in the media, editor liability under criminal law, editor liability under civil law, civil liability for owners and publishers of mass media, as well as the editor's duties and liability in connection with user-generated content.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The measure has been proposed to the Parliament and is not yet implemented.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

White Paper on Media Support: Report no. 8 (2018-2019) to the Storting (Meld. St. 17 (2018–2019) Mangfald og armlengds avstand)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The White Paper discussed the use of financial instruments to realize the Government's goals in media policy. In the report, the Government proposed a new financing model for the public service broadcaster NRK. The White Paper also discussed key goals for the direct support schemes in the media field. It proposed a new model for managing media support, with three main elements: establishing media support for fixed four-year cycles, facilitating a more comprehensive media policy by reviewing the media policy instruments in a budget statement every four years, and strengthening the editorial independence of the media by establishing an independent body, the Media Support Council.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
From January 1 2020, the public service broadcaster NRK is funded through tax revenue, based on the proposal in the White Paper. The Norwegian Ministry of Culture has held a public hearing on a proposal for a new Media Support Law. The proposal provides the framework for the new model presented in the White Paper. Based on the hearing, the Government has since withdrawn the proposed Media Support Council, and the Media Support Law has not yet been proposed to the Storting (the national parliament).
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Norwegian Media Authority

White Paper on Commercial Public Service: Report No. 14 (2016-2017) to the Storting (Meld. St. 14 (2016–2017) Kommersiell allmennkringkasting)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The White Paper assesses the need for Government measures aimed at commercial public service broadcasting. The Norwegian Ministry of Culture concluded that there is a risk of losing commercial public service media if it is left to the market alone, and the Ministry therefore proposed to temporarely compensate a commercial public service broadcaster. TV 2 AS has signed an agreement for commercial public broadcasting with the Ministry of Culture. TV2 will be compensated for their net costs associated with the agreement. The Government's contribution will be up to NOK 135 million per year for a period of five years.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The measure was implemented in 2019 and has not been evaluated yet. The Norwegian Media Authority oversees TV2's fulfillment of the agreement, and delivers an annual report.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

135 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK) per year for a period of five years.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Norwegian Media Authority
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
TV2 AS
Type of entity: 
Private Sector

White Paper on Public Service Broadcasting (NRK): Report No. 15 (2016-2017) to the Storting (Meld. St. 15 (2016-2017). Eit moderne og framtidsretta NRK.)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The White Paper considered questions concerning the government-funded public broadcaster NRK. The White Paper includes proposals for the future funding of NRK, a revised mandate for the NRK ("NRK-plakaten"), and proposed a process by which the NRK's income is determined every four years.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The White Paper proposed key elements for a new financing model for the NRK. The White Paper was followed by another White Paper that proposed a specific model for funding the NRK (cf. the preceding measure described in the present report). Based on the White Paper, the Storting (the national parliament) passed a new mandate (NRK-plakat) which states the NRK's overall assignment.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

The Innovation and Development Grant Scheme for News and Current Affairs Media

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
One of the proposals from the Media Diversity Commission, which submitted its report to the Norwegian Government in March 2016, was to implement a new grant scheme for editorial innovation for news and current affairs media. A grant scheme for such projects was implementet in 2018. It is mainly directed at small local news and current affairs media. The smaller local news media have often fallen behind digitally, and do not have the resources to innovate and develop new digital products. The goal of the support scheme is to strengthen media diversity by stimulating editorial, content-oriented innovation and development in news and news media. The scheme is managed by the Norwegian Media Authority.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In 2018, 18 projects received a total of 7 million NOK. The Media Authority received 71 applications, which suggests that there is a need for this type of project support in the media sector. In 2019, 24 projects received a total of 10 million NOK. 98 per cent of the total amount was allocated to propjects from small and local news media. Because of the number of applications and positive feedback from the media sector, the Storting (the national parliament) has decided to double the eligible amount in 2020 to 20 million NOK.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

20 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK) in 2020.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Norwegian Media Authority
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Entorno digital

Policies, measures or mechanisms are in place to support the digital transformation of cultural and creative industries and institutions (e.g. funding for digitization of analogue industries): 
YES
Policies or measures have been introduced to ensure vibrant domestic digital cultural and creative industries markets with a diversity of e-players of all sizes (e.g. fair remuneration rules; control market concentration; prevention of monopolies of digital content providers/distributors or their algorithms that potentially restrict the diversity of cultural expressions, etc.):: 
NO
Policies and measures have been implemented to enhance access to and discoverability of domestically produced cultural content in the digital environment (e.g. action plans or policies for digital content pluralism, public support to cultural or artistic portals in specific languages, national or regional online distribution platforms for domestic content, etc.): 
YES
Measures and initiatives have been implemented to promote digital creativity and competencies of artists and other cultural professionals working with new technologies (e.g. spaces for experimentation, incubators, etc.): 
YES
Statistics or studies with recent data on access to digital media, including on the type of cultural content available through digital media, are available: 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

The Norwegian Language Bank ("Språkbanken") – National Infrastructure for Language Technology

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
National Library of Norway
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
An increasing number of products and services are based on language technology. To enable Norwegian citizens to use the products and services in their own language, good language resources in both Norwegian and Sami are needed. In order to develop high-quality language technology for Norwegian language, big data sets with Norwegian speech and text are needed. The Norwegian Language Bank is a national infrastructure for language technology and provides such datasets. The resources are aimed at companies that develop language technology software, as well as language researchers and students, and all the resources that are created are available online and have an open-source license. The Language Bank is an infrastructure for language technology in many areas of society, and is not limited to the cultural and creative sectors. Divvun and Giellatekno, the research group for Saami language technology at the Arctic University of Norway, are both developing language technology tools for Sami. The Government will continue facilitating the collection of and access to language resources, cf. Norway's National Strategy for Artificial Intelligence (2020) and White Paper on Language Policy (2020).
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The development of more products/services based on language technology in Norwegian and Sami.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

The Language Bank was established in 2010 with an annual funding of about 10 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK) a year. In 2019, the Government increased the allocation to the Language Bank by 9 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK).

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Language Council of Norway
Type of entity: 
Public Sector
Name of partner: 
A number of private entities and other government agencies.
Type of entity: 
Private Sector

The Gaming Strategy "Game Room. Strategy for computer games 2020–2022"

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
With the Strategy, which was launched on September 4, 2019, the Government aims to elevate the Norwegian gaming culture as a cultural expression, art form, industry and leisure activity, and help the gaming community to develop an industry that can assert itself both nationally and internationally.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Government grants were increased by 10 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK) in the state budget for 2020.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

Government grants were increased by 10 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK) in the state budget for 2020.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Norwegian Film Institute
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

The Filmbib Streaming Service and the Purchasing Scheme for Norwegian Films in Public Libraries.

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Film Institute
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Filmbib is the distribution channel for the Purchasing Scheme for Short Films and Documentaries. Filmbib gives the audience an opportunity to view Norwegian documentaries, short films and animation films through the library website or an app on their smartphone, both free of charge.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
More than 500 Norwegian short films and documentaries are available to the public through Filmbib, of which 68 films were purchased in 2019. The number of viewers almost doubled in 2019.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

1,9 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK) in 2019.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
YES
If yes, what are the main conclusions/recommendations?: 

The evaluation resulted in several adjustments made to the Scheme in 2018. The most important adjustments were increased remuneration rates, extended application terms and giving permission to screen purchased films in the library.

Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Public libraries in Norway.
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

The Purchasing Scheme for Computer Games in Public Libraries

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Film Institute
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Purchasing Scheme for Computer Games in Public Libraries gives the audience an opportunity to play Norwegian computer games in public libraries, free of charge.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The Norwegian Film Institute has purchased a total of 79 norwegian computer games within the Scheme since its inception in 2016. 532 public libraries have signed up for the Scheme.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

1, 3 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK) in 2019.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Public libraries in Norway.
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Partnering with Civil Society

Professional organizations and/or trade unions representing artists and/or cultural professionals in the following sectors exist in your country (i.e. federation of musicians, publishers unions, etc.): 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Publishing
Visual Arts
Performing Arts
Public funding schemes supporting CSOs involvement in promoting the diversity of cultural expressions exist: 
YES
Training and mentoring opportunities were organized or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years to build skills on communication, advocacy and/or fundraising of civil society organizations involved in the promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions: 
NO
Dialogue mechanisms between public authorities and CSOs for cultural policy making and/or monitoring have been implemented during the last 4 years (meetings, working groups, etc.): 
YES
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
Public input meetings between public authorities and civil society organizations for cultural policy making in relation to the White Paper on Cultural Policy launched in 2018.
Public input meetings in relation to a White Paper on Artist Policy planned to be launched in 2020.
Policies and measures promoting the diversity of cultural expressions have been elaborated in consultation with CSOs during the last 4 years: 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

White Paper on the Voluntary Sector: Report No. 10 (2018-2019) to the Storting (Meld. St. 10 (2018-2019. Frivilligheita – sterk, sjøvstendig, mangfaldig).

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The White Paper presents the Norwegian Government's policies toward the voluntary sector and civil society organizations. The White Paper provides four objectives/goals: 1. Widespread participation in voluntary activity 2. A strong and independent sector 3. A reform to reduce bureaucracy 4. A coordinated policy for the voluntary sector The White Paper includes multiple measures to achieve all four objectives/goals.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The White Paper has set a new course for the Government's policies toward voluntary organizations. There is, as an example, an increased emphasis on widespread participation, including from minorities.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

10 billion Norwegian Kroner (NOK) in annual government grants to the voluntary sector.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Most ministries and government agencies that provide grants to or collaborate with voluntary organizations, and the voluntary organizations themselves.
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Goal 2 - Achieve a Balanced Flow of Cultural Goods and Services and Increase the Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Mobility of Artists and Cultural Professionals

Please indicate if the following policies and measures exist in your country: 
Policies and measures supporting the outward mobility of artists and cultural professionals (e.g. export offices, support for participation in international cultural markets for cultural professionals, etc.)
Specific visa policies or other cross border measures supporting the inward mobility of foreign artists and cultural professionals in your country (e.g. simplified visa procedures, reduced fees for visas, visas for longer durations)
Work permit regulations supporting the inward mobility of foreign artists and cultural professionals in your country (e.g. double taxation avoidance agreements, special work permits and health insurance, subsidies to cover living expenses, etc.)
Please indicate if the following operational programmes have been developed or supported/funded by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Information resources or training services providing practical guidance to facilitate the mobility of cultural professionals (e.g. Internet platforms)
Infrastructure (e.g. arts residencies, cultural institutes, etc.) having a mandate to promote the diversity of cultural expressions and hosting a large number of foreign artists, notably from developing countries
Major cultural events (e.g. cultural seasons, festivals, cultural industries markets, etc.) having a mandate to promote the diversity of cultural expressions and hosting a large number of foreign artists, notably from developing countries
Please indicate if the following mobility funds (e.g. scholarships, travel grants, etc.) have been managed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years: 
Public funds supporting the outward mobility of national or resident artists and other cultural professionals
Public funds supporting the inward mobility of foreign artists and other cultural professionals, notably from developing countries
Public funds specifically supporting the mobility of artists and other cultural professionals from or between developing countries, including through North-South-South and South-South cooperation
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Flow of Cultural Goods and Services

Export strategies or measures to support the distribution of cultural goods and services outside your country exist for the following cultural domains: 
Cinema/Audiovisual arts
Design
Media Arts
Music
Publishing
Visual Arts
Performing Arts
Your country has granted or benefited from preferential treatment* to support a balanced exchange of cultural goods and services in the last 4 years: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Your country has provided or benefited in the last 4 years from Aid for Trade support, a form of Official Development Assistance (ODA), that helped to build capacities to formulate trade policies, participate in negotiating and implementing agreements that provide a special status to cultural goods and services: 
-
If YES, please provide up to 2 examples: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Tratados y acuerdos

Multilateral or bilateral trade and/or investment agreements providing a special status to cultural goods and/or services have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negociation: 
YES
Multilateral or bilateral agreements including specific provisions providing a special status to cultural goods and services and digital products in the field of e-commerce have been signed during the last 4 years or are under negotiation: 
YES
Multilateral or bilateral agreements, declarations and/or strategies on relevant policy issues for the diversity of cultural expressions (e.g. education, digital, intellectual property, sustainable development, gender equality, etc.) signed or amended to take into account the objectives or principles of the Convention during the last 4 years: 
NO
Relevant Policies and Measures: 
-

Goal 3 - Integrate Culture in Sustainable Development Frameworks

National Sustainable Development Policies & Plans

National sustainable development plans and strategies recognize the strategic role of: 
Culture (in general)
Creativity and innovation
Cultural and creative industries
Please rate from 1 to 4 the type of outcomes expected by the inclusion of culture in national sustainable development plans and strategies 1 most often expected outcome 4 least expected outcome): 
Economic (e.g. employment, trade, intellectual property, cultural and creative industries, rural and territorial development): 
2
Social (e.g. social cohesion and inclusion, inequality and poverty reduction, values and identity, vulnerable and minority groups, empowerment and human capital, education): 
3
Environmental (e.g. natural resources, reducing environmental impact of cultural industries and practices): 
1
Cultural (e.g. cultural infrastructure, participation and access to culture, innovation, artists support): 
1
Public cultural bodies and agencies responsible for culture or creative industries are involved in the design and implementation of sustainable development policies and plans (i.e. participate in coordination mechanisms such as joint planning committees): 
NO
Cultural industry-led regeneration initiatives and projects at the regional, urban and/or rural levels have been implemented in the last 4 years: 
YES
Policies and measures facilitate participation in cultural life and access to diverse cultural facilities and expressions, notably addressing the needs of disadvantaged or vulnerable groups (e.g. via reduced entrance fees; audience development, arts education and audiences awareness-raising): 
NO
Latest data on cultural participation rates by socio demographic variables (sex/age groups/rural- urban/income levels/education levels): 
The Norwegian Cultural Barometer is a publication based on Statistics Norway’s survey about the use of cultural offerings. In the survey, a representative sample of the total population aged 9-79 answers questions about how often they have used different cultural offerings in last 12 months. The survey also quantifies the population’s interest in culture, access to different cultural offerings and respondents own activities in the field of culture. The latest survey was carried out in 2016. The following results are taken from this survey. (https://www.ssb.no/kultur-og-fritid/artikler-og publikasjoner/_attachment/308555?_ts=15c118b8418) Percentage of people who have been to a museum during the last 12 months (2016): Gender Women 45% Men 43% Age 9-12 62% 20-24 46% 35-44 50% 67-79 39% Education Secondary school (7-9 years of education) 35% High school (10-12 years of education) 36% University (13-16 years of education) 52% University (More than 16 years of education) 62% Urban-rural living >100 000 inhabitants 53% 20 000 – 99 000 inhabitants 43% <20 000 inhabitants 44% Countryside (scattered) 38% Household income NOK 1 300 000 53% Percentage of people who have been to a library during the last 12 months (2016): Gender Women 54% Men 39% Age 9-12 66% 20-24 40% 35-44 56% 67-79 42% Education, level Secondary school (7-9 years of education) 39% High school (10-12 years of education) 34% University (13-16 years of education) 56% University (More than 16 years of education) 57% Urban-rural living >100 000 inhabitants 48% 20 000 – 99 000 inhabitants 51% <20 000 inhabitants 47% Countryside (scattered) 40% Household income NOK 1 300 000 44% Percentage of people who have been to a cultural festival during the last 12 months (2016): Gender Women 31% Men 33% Age 9-12 25% 20-24 58% 35-44 29% 67-79 16% Education, level Secondary school (7-9 years of education) 36% High school (10-12 years of education) 30% University (13-16 years of education) 36% University (More than 16 years of education) 29% Urban-rural living >100 000 inhabitants 34% 20 000 – 99 000 inhabitants 33% <20 000 inhabitants 35% Countryside (scattered) 27% Household income NOK 1 300 000 31% Percentage of people who have been to the cinema during the last 12 months (2016): Gender Women 73% Men 72% Age 9-12 90% 20-24 89% 35-44 79% 67-79 40% Education, level Secondary school (7-9 years of education) 67% High school (10-12 years of education) 64% University (13-16 years of education) 78% University (More than 16 years of education) 81% Urban-rural living >100 000 inhabitants 78% 20 000 – 99 000 inhabitants 76% <20 000 inhabitants 72% Countryside (scattered) 65% Household income NOK 1 300 000 85% Percentage of people who have been to theatre/musical/revue during the last 12 months (2016): Gender Women 57% Men 43% Age 9-12 59% 20-24 48% 35-44 55% 67-79 44% Education, level Secondary school (7-9 years of education) 38% High school (10-12 years of education) 47% University (13-16 years of education) 55% University (More than 16 years of education) 62% Urban-rural living >100 000 inhabitants 60% 20 000 – 99 000 inhabitants 49% <20 000 inhabitants 49% Countryside (scattered) 44% Household income NOK 1 300 000 63% Percentage of people who are regularly playing an instrument: Gender Women 8% Men 11% Age 9-12 26% 20-24 14% 35-44 7% 67-79 2% Education, level Secondary school (7-9 years of education) 8% High school (10-12 years of education) 5% University (13-16 years of education) 9% University (More than 16 years of education) 14% Urban-rural living >100 000 inhabitants 10% 20 000 – 99 000 inhabitants 10% <20 000 inhabitants 10% Countryside (scattered) 9% Percentage of people who are regularly singing in a choir/orcestra Gender Women 8% Men 6% Age 9-12 18% 20-24 5% 35-44 6% 67-79 4% Education, level Secondary school (7-9 years of education) 4% High school (10-12 years of education) 5% University (13-16 years of education) 7% University (More than 16 years of education) 11% Urban-rural living >100 000 inhabitants 6% 20 000 – 99 000 inhabitants 7% <20 000 inhabitants 8% Countryside (scattered) 6% Share of population who have used following medium on an average day (percent) 2018 TV total 60 Books total 25 Share of population playing digital games on an average day (percent) 2018 Total 35 Men 38 Women 32 Persons 9-15 years old 81 Persons 16-24 years old 59 Persons 25-44 years old 33 Persons 45-66 years old 17 Persons 67-79 years old 15 Persons with secondary school education 43 Persons with high school education 26 Persons with short university/college degree 28 Persons with long university/college degree 21
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Action Plan for Inclusion and Representativity in Norwegian Films and Film Culture

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Film Institute
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Medios de comunicación
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Action Plan is aiming to improve the quality, increase relevance, and strengthen the sustainability of Norwegian films in the future. The measures presented aim at the entire film industry through the Norwegian Film Institute’s external activities and schemes, as well as measures aimed at their day-to-day operations and internal organization. The Action Plan applies for 2019–2023, with evaluation and adjustments along the way.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The implementation of the measures is still in an early phase. The Norwegian Film Instute has started emphasising diversity in their grant management, and has also taken several initiatives to discuss possible diversity measures with the film industry, such as seminars and workshops. Further results remain to be seen throuthout the period.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

Granting Estates without Heirs to Voluntary Activities for the Benefit of Children and Young People

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Children and Youth Council (LNU)
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Previously, the estates of deceased people without heirs were endowed to the State. From 2016, estates without heirs have been granted to voluntary activities for the benefit of children and young people. Civil society prganizations can apply for grants for projects that stimulate young people's participation in civil society. Projects that target children and young people with disabilities are prioritised.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
YES
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
In the first three years of implementation, nearly 260 projects have been implemented.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

The yearly amount available has differed between 8,1 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK) and 24, 5 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK), depending on the size of estates deemed to be without heirs each year.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Norwegian Association of the Deaf's youth organization
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
YWCA-YMCA Guides and Scouts of Norway
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Press – Save the Children's youth organization
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Hyperion
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)

An Inclusive Cultural Sector in the Nordics (2017-2019)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Arts Council Norway
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
An Inclusive Cultural Sector in the Nordics was a flagship initiative launched by the Norwegian Presidency of the Nordic Council of Ministers in 2017, co-founded by the Norwegian Ministry of Culture and the Nordic Council of Ministers for the three-year period 2017-2019. The project aimed to identify challenges and solutions for social inclusion and inclusiveness both in the professional and voluntary cultural sector. The project took its point of departure in the gathering and sharing of knowledge across the Nordic countries, and had an arts-centred approach to embracing diversity. It has explored how organisations, institutions and artists can enrich the work they do by embracing a wide range of diverse influences and practices. The project explored three main focus areas, namely 1) Inclusive and diverse cultural structures; including issues relating to participation, recognition and representation in arts and culture; 2) inclusive and diverse institutions, including issues relating to tools and methods for engaging and building relations with new audiences and artistic expressions; and 3) inclusive and diverse local communities, including issues relating to culture and the role of civil society as driving forcess in the process of creating inclusive local communities. The closing conference "Nordic Dialogues" was held in Oslo in December 2019, with participation from the UNESCO Secretariat.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
A number of recommendations have been presented to the Government. The project launched a series of Nordic topical networks for exchanging ideas, experiences, knowledge tools and methods; including but not limited to networks for artists with multicultural backgrounds, libraries, art museums and music and arts chools for children. The final report of the project is available on the project website (in Norwegian only). Six topical publications have also been launched, most of them in English.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

6 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK) in national funding, as well as 6 million Danish Kroner (DKK) in funding from the Nordic Council of Ministers.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
A number of Nordic government agencies for the arts have been closely involved and have participated in the project's Nordic working group. In addition, a number of arts and cultural institutions in the Nordic countries, including in autonomous regions, h
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

International Cooperation for Sustainable Development

Your country has contributed to or benefited from the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) during the last 4 years: 
-
Development cooperation strategies, including South-South cooperation strategies, recognize the strategic role of creativity and diverse cultural expressions: 
YES
If YES, please provide the name(s) of the strategy and year(s) of adoption: 
The Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs' White Paper to the Storting No. 24 (2016-2017): (Meld. St. 24 (2016–2017). Felles ansvar for felles fremtid — Bærekraftsmålene og norsk utviklingspolitikk.) The Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs operated gra
Your country manages multi- and/or bilateral technical assistance and capacity building cooperation programmes supporting: 
-
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Efforts and Initiatives to Protect and Promote Cultural Rights

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
As highlighted in the Norwegian Government’s political platform and the White Paper The Power of Culture – Cultural Policy for the Future (Meld. St. 8 (2018-2019)), art and other forms of cultural expressions have the power to build societies. Cultural activities and civil society are crucial for the development of societies and for ensuring an enlightened public debate. Art and culture are an integral part of any democratic and free society. A vibrant, diverse cultural sector is dependent on freedom of expression, freedom of assembly and human creativity. It is important that cultural activities are varied and relevant to all segments of society. For all these reasons, it is vital to ensure the freedom to create and enjoy art and other forms of cultural expression. Cultural rights and artistic freedom of expression are under pressure. People are being denied the right to take part in cultural activities for political reasons, or on grounds of religion or tradition. The work of artists is being censored and artists are being persecuted. Women are particularly vulnerable. Norway’s priorities in this regard are fostering robust, independent cultural sectors in developing countries is a key objective of the Government’s development policy. Promoting cultural rights and protecting cultural heritage, including world heritage, are key priorities. These efforts are an integral part of Norway’s global engagement to promote human rights, including freedom of expression. The Norwegian Government provides the following: • support for international and national civil society organisations that work to promote artistic freedom of expression; • support for the protection of artists who have fled their homes, for example through the International Cities of Refuge Network (ICORN) and SafeMUSE; • support for organisations and groups that are working to improve conditions for artists and cultural workers by providing training at all levels; • support for UNESCO’s work to strengthen artistic freedom; and • support for the mandate of UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights through the OHCHR Secretariat in Geneva. Both tangible and intangible cultural heritage form part of the individual and collective memories that are passed down from generation to generation. We often say that we understand the present through the recorded past, including material from archives, museums and libraries. The collective memory of a social group also includes skills that are learned from earlier generations, such as handicrafts, songs and dances, food traditions and rituals, and all the other things we call our intangible cultural heritage. Cultural heritage is an important component of people’s sense of identity and belonging. It forms part of the basis for social and political development. Access to history and cultural heritage is a democratic right, as set out in the White Paper The Power of Culture – Cultural Policy for the Future (Meld. St. 8 (2018-2019)).
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
Increased understanding and acceptance of the actual situation globally when it comes to artistic freedom on all levels: for the international community (the UN system), through capacity building for states parties on the implementation of the 2005 Convention (support to UNESCO's Aschberg Programme). For civil society organisations, artists and audiences: more information shared and capacity-building and safeguarding of artists through the important work of civil society and rights organisations such as Freemuse, Safemuse and ICORN, mobility schemes for artists such as AMA and ASEF, and through support to independent cultural funds such as AFAC and the Palestinian Culture Fund. In spite of increased pressure on cultural rights/artistic freedom, work at all levels gets more consolidated and partnerships across levels are more visible. Support to emergency efforts to safeguard and restore damage of cultural heritage globally through the support to Heritage Emergency Fund. Emergencies under the Fund serves all six UNESCO cultural conventions.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

100 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK)

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Freemuse
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
Safemuse
Type of entity: 
Civil Society Organization (CSO)
Name of partner: 
ICORN

Goal 4 - Promote Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

Gender Equality

Ministries, governmental agencies and/or parliamentary bodies in charge of gender equality: 
Exist and are relevant for artists and cultural professionals
Policies and measures to support the full participation of women in cultural life have been implemented during the last 4 years: 
YES
Policies and measures have been adopted to support the recognition and advancement of women as artists, cultural professionals and/or creative entrepreneurs, (e.g. ensure equal pay for equal work or equal access to funding, coaching or mentoring schemes, anti-discrimination measures, etc.): 
YES
Data is regularly collected and disseminated to monitor: 
Gender equality in the culture and media sectors
Participation of women in cultural life
Percentage of works from female/male artists displayed / projected in important festivals of the arts and cultural industries (film, book publishing, music industry etc.): 
Cf. the questions below, which we are unable to answer in the given format requested by the form, please note the following: The Ministry of Culture awards annual prizes to the best children’s and young adult books. During the 2003-2019 period, the prizes have been awarded to 77 women (53 per cent) and 69 men (47 per cent). Percentage of women participation in cultural activities: The following data are taken from the latest survey of the Norwegian Cultural Barometer which was carried out by Statistics Norway in 2016. Percentage of women who have used different cultural offerings during the last 12 months: Museum: 45 % women Library: 53 % women Cultural festival: 31 % women Cinema: 73 % women Theatre/musical/revue: 57 % women Percentage of women who have participated in different cultural activities during the last 12 months: Know how to play an instrument 31 % women Playing an instrument regularly 8 % women Singing in choir: 8 % women Has performed publicly (song/music): 13 % women
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

The UP Development Programme for Female Filmmakers

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Film Institute
Cultural domains covered by the policy/measure: 
Cine / Artes audiovisuales
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
UP was a development programme for female filmmakers from underrepresented groups, implemented by the Norwegian Film Institute in collaboration with Talent Norway in 2018–2019. The programme offered scholarships, professional workshops, process meetings, coaching, and funding for professional development.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
12 directors and producers were offered scholarships, professional workshops, process meetings, coaching, and funding for professional development. The percentage of female recipients of production grants within the general schemes administrated by the Norwegian Film Institute was the highest ever (52 per cent) in 2019.
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Talent Norway
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

New Legal Provisions to Strengthen Public Authoritiesʼ and Employersʼ Duty to Make Active Equality Efforts.

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
All public authorities and employers.
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Active equality efforts – Duty of employers to promote equality The Equality and Anti-Discrimination Act of 2018 stated that all employers, regardless of size, and including also the cultural and creative sector, were obliged to make active, targeted and systematic efforts to promote equality and prevent discrimination in all their operations on all discrimination grounds. Employers in the public sector and employers in the private sector with more than 50 employees, were obliged to follow a four-step model in their equality work. Further, according to the 2018 Act, undertakings that were required by the Accounting Act to submit an annual report, were obliged to issue a statement on equality in their annual report. As a result of amendments in the Accounting Act in 2018, the duty to prepare an annual report did not apply to small undertakings. In January 2020, amendments in the Equality and Anti-discrimination Act, clarifying and strenghtening the employers activity and reporting duties, entered into force. Firstly, the activity duty which applies to all employers is continued and clarified. The new rules clarifiy that the duty includes proactive work against intersectional discrimination. The new rules also clarify that the duty includes an obligation to prevent harassment, sexual harassment and gender-based violence. Secondly, according to the new rules, all employers, regardless of size and sector, shall document how they work to fulfil their obligations to work actively, targeted and systematic to promote equality and prevent discrimination. Thirdly, as before, the activity duties of public employers and private employers with 50 employees or more are more extensive. These employers are still obliged to follow the four-step model to fulfill their duty to work actively, targeted and systematically to promote equality and prevent discrimination. According to the amendments, this includes a review on pay conditions by reference to gender and to review the use of involuntary part-time work. Fourthly, as before, public employers and private employers with 50 employees or more are obliged to report in their annual report or another public document on the status of gender equality and how they work to comply with the activity duty. This includes, among others, the gender balance in the undertaking, proportion of part-time work, proportion of temporary employees, the results of the pay review and the review of the use of involuntary part-time work. Finally, the new rules also state that the activity and reporting duties which apply to the public and bigger private enterprises shall now also apply to private undertakings that ordinarily employ more than 20 persons if requested by the employees or employee representatives. The Equality and Anti-discrimination Ombud is mandated to scrutinize the activity duty of employers, as well as their new duties to issue a statement on their equality work. The Ombud is entitled to make follow-up visits to enterprises and may require access to the enterprises' documentation relating to the employers' equality and anti-discrimination work. Employers' breach of the duty to issue statement can be brought before the Anti-discrimination Tribunal. Active equality efforts – the duty of public authorities to promote equality: The Equality and Anti-Discrimination Act of 2018 stated that public authorities, both as employers, public authorities and service providers, had a legal duty to make active, targeted and systematic efforts to promote equality and to prevent discrimination. In January 2020, these duties were clarified and strenghtened. The new rules clarify that the public authorites`duty to promote equality and prevent discrimination, in capacity as public autority and service provider, includes an obligation to prevent harassment, sexual harassment and gender-based violence, and to counter stereotyping. The new rules also give public authorities, in capacity as public autority and service provider, a duty to issue a statement on their work with equality issues. The duty to issue a statement entails the following: public authorities shall issue a statement on what they are doing to integrate considerations relating to equality and non-discrimination into their work, public authorities shall describe what they are doing to convert equality and non-discrimination principles, procedures and standards into action, public authorities shall provide an assessment as to what has been achieved as a result of these efforts, and outline expectations with regards to future efforts in this area. The statement shall be provided in the annual report or another document available to the general public. The duty of public authorities to promote equality apply to all public authorities, including public authorties in cultural and creative sectors. The Equality and Anti-discrimination Ombud is given mandate to scrutinize the activity duty of public authorities. The Ombud is entitled to make follow-up visits to enterprises and may require access to the enterprises' documentation relating to the employers' equality and anti-discrimination work.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
There have been challenges in the implementation of the duty of active equality efforts. The duties are therefore now strengthened and clarified. The new rules entail that employers and public authorities are obliged to report more than before, and the Ombud shall now also supervise the activity duty. The Norwegian Ministry of Culture assumes that the strengthening of the regulation will ensure more adequate and efficient implementation of these duties.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

The Norwegian Ministry of Culture has allocated 3 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK) to the Ombud to follow up on the activity duty and to cover the Ombud's work to provide guidence on the new provisions about sexual harassment.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
The Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs has, in cooperation with relevant partners, including labour unions and employers' associations, prepared a guidance document for implementation of the activity duty.
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Libertad artística

The constitution and/or national regulatory frameworks formally acknowledge: 
The right of artists to create without censorship or intimidation
The right of artists to disseminate and/or perform their artistic works
The right for all citizens to freely enjoy artistic works both in public and in private
The right for all citizens to take part in cultural life without restrictions
Independent bodies are established to receive complaints and/or monitor violations and restrictions to artistic freedom: 
YES
Initiatives to protect artists at risk or in exile have been developed or supported by public authorities during the last 4 years (e.g. providing safe houses, guidance and training, etc.): 
YES
Measures and initiatives intended to ensure transparent decision-making on government funding/ state grants and awards for artists exist (e.g. through independent committees, etc.): 
YES
Social protection measures that take the professional status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. health insurance, retirement schemes, unemployment benefits, etc.): 
YES
Economic measures that take the status of artists into account have been adopted or revised in the last 4 years (e.g. collective agreements, income tax and other regulatory frameworks, etc.): 
YES
Relevant Policies and Measures: 

Arts Council Norway Act (Lov om Norsk kulturråd)

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
Arts Council Norway is the main governmental operator for the implementation of Norwegian cultural policy. Arts Council Norway functions as an advisory body to the central government and public sector on cultural affairs. The Arts Council is fully financed by the Norwegian Ministry of Culture. Arts Council Norway supports arts and cultural projects throughout Norway. It conducts developmental work, and helps ensure that art and culture are created, documented, preserved and made accessible to the broadest possible audience. The aim is to guarantee an arts and cultural sector in Norway that is vibrant and diverse. Each year, the Council receives some 20,000 applications for funding. In 2017, the Council handled around 139 million EUR in state funds earmarked for arts and culture, which is about 10 per cent of the national cultural budget. The work of the Arts Council Norway is regulated through the Act on the Arts Council Norway. The Act was passed in 2013 and confirms the Arts Council's independence and the principle of an arm's length from political intervention in the council's cultural professional decisions.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO
Partner(s) engaged in the implementation of the measure: 
Name of partner: 
Arts Council Norway
Type of entity: 
Public Sector

Governmental Commission on Freedom of Expression

Name of agency responsible for the implementation of the policy/measure: 
The Commission is appointed by the Norwegian Ministry of Culture, which provides its budget.
Describe the main features of the policy/measure: 
The Commission will discuss the social, technological, legal and financial framework for freedom of expression in today's society. The basic legal protection of freedom of expression in the Norwegian Constitution was revised in 2004 and is itself not part of the Commission's mandate. Instead, the Commission will assess how the conditions for exercising the right to expression and information in practice have changed. In particular, digitization of the media and communication sectors have drastically altered both the production, distribution and consumption of content and services. This has i.a. weakened the gatekeeping role of traditional editors and editor controlled journalistic media. At the same time, consumers have taken on new roles as content producers and publishers, without having the experience or established professional and ethical standards which guide traditional journalism. At the same time, global platforms and social media algorithms greatly affect which content and expressions the consumers are subjected to. There are also rising concerns about hate speech and disinformation as well as threats and harassment against journalists, politicians, academics and other participants in the public discourse.
Does it specifically target young people?: 
NO
Does the International Fund for Cultural Diversity (IFCD) support the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
NO
What are the results achieved so far through the implementation of the policy/measure?: 
The report (Green Paper) will be published by 1 March 2022.
Financial resources allocated to the policy/measure in USD: 

Not yet specified.

Has the implementation of the policy/measure been evaluated?: 
NO

Measures and Initiatives reported by Civil Society Organizations

Describe how the CSO form has been used to promote collaboration with CSOs in the preparation of this report, including the distribution of the form and the modalities of collection and analysis of the information received. Please indicate the percentage of measures and initiatives received that have been considered as relevant by the Party and included in the QPR.: 
The Norwegian National Commission fo UNESCO acts as a link between the Government and civil society. The Commission has been invited to contribute to the report using the CSO Form, and has been invited to comment on a draft version of the report.
GOAL 1 - Support sustainable systems of governance for culture: 
-
GOAL 2 - Achieve a balanced flow of cultural goods and services and increase the mobility of artists and cultural professionals: 
-
GOAL 3 - Integrate culture in sustainable development frameworks: 
-
GOAL 4 - Promote human rights and fundamental freedoms: 
-
On the basis of the analysis of the responses provided through the CSO form, present up to ten main priorities of CSOs to implement the Convention over the next four years.: 
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Emerging Transversal Issues

Relevant Policies and Measures: 
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Challenges and Achievements

Describe the main results achieved to implement the Convention (at least one major achievement in one of the four goals): 
The elaboration of the new White Paper on cultural policy, which was presented to the Storting (the national parliament) by the Ministry of Culture in December 2018, took place in an open and inclusive process and in close dialogue with the arts and cultural sector, civil society organisations and other stakeholders. Both the extensive consultation process and the White Paper itself resulted in important insights and underlined the importance of a multi-stakeholder, rights-based approach to policy development and implementation. Through the White Paper, the Government highlighted the inherent contribution of art and culture to human rights and a thriving democracy and renewed its strong commitment to actively promoting the freedom of speech and expression, including the freedom of artistic expression. These key priorities also govern the Norwegian Government's commitment to international cooperation in the field of art and culture. A number of key instruments, initiatives and measures have also been under implementation or development in the preceding four-year period, many of which are described in the present report, including the new Copyright Act which constitutes an important revision, bringing the pertinent legislation up-to-date and helps ensure fair remeneration to artists in the digital era.
Describe the main challenges encountered to implement the Convention and the main solutions found or envisaged to overcome them: 
Ensuring access to arts and culture of high artistic quality for everyone, in the entire country, and making sure that everyone has the opportunity to engage with cultural life both passively and actively, regardless of their economic, social or cultural background, age, gender or functional ability, remains an important priority. In order to realise the vision that everyone has the right to culture, artistic and cultural expressions must be disseminated to more people, and people must be able to participate in art and culture in new ways. A strengthened focus on art and culture's importance for building social cohesion and community is a key priority for the Norwegian Ministry of Culture, which is headed by the Minister of Culture and Equality. The Ministry's remit thus includes other key policy areas such as gender equality and anti-discrimination. This enables the Ministry to take a holistic view in the development of measures and initiatives. A number of on-going processes described in our answer to the question below will result in i.a. the presentation of a number of topical White Papers to the Parliament. These will take stock of and present suggestions to overcome pertinent emerging and existing challenges.
Describe the steps planned in the next four years to further implement the Convention and the priority areas identified for future policy action based on the conclusions of the current reporting process: 
The reporting process as such does not give any substantial input to the implementation of Norwegian cultural policy. As stated in the Executive Summary, Norwegian cultural policy is considered to be inherently in line with the Convention and its spirit, and no specific measures with the stated aim of implementing the Convention are taken as such. Instead, the totality of various cultural policy measures and initiatives contribute both directly and indirectly to its implementation, without necessarily using it as a specific reference. Emerging and existing challenges, measures and initiatives are continually under review and development through monitoring and evaluation initiatives as well as consultations with stakeholders, government authorities and civil society organisations. The Norwegian Ministry of Culture is currently preparing a number of substantial White Papers to be presented to the Parliament. Three separate White Papers are under preparation: on arts and culture for children and young people; on the status of the artist and on museums. The independent expert commission on the freedom of speech and expression, described in this report, will present its Green Paper to the Ministry. It will be used as a point of departure to examine and draft measures aimed at strengthening and safeguarding these key principles for the future. In addition, the Culture Act (described in Norway's first quadrennial periodic report submitted in 2012) is currently under revision. The Act obliges the national government to promote and protect the diversity of cultural expressions. It also obliges all government levels to promote and facilitate a broad spectrum of cultural activities in the entire country through legal, economic, organisational and other relevant measures and initiatives. A new strategy on international cooperation in arts and culture is currently under development by the Norwegian Ministries of Culture and Foreign Affairs.

Annexes

Please upload relevant documents (law, policy, agreement, regulation, strategy, etc.), studies and statistics in PDF format related to the implementation of the 4 goals and the 11 areas of monitoring of the Convention in your country. The documents should have been produced during the reporting period covered by this periodic report. Please provide the title and a description of the main content of the document in English or French.: 

Submission

Designated official signing the report: 
Title: 
Ms.
First name: 
Cecilia S.
Family name: 
Lyche
Organization: 
Norwegian Ministry of Culture
Position: 
Deputy Director General
Date of submission: 
2020
Electronic Signature: